Data Security

Milwaukee Bucks prove even NBA teams fall victim to email phishing

Milwaukee Bucks prove even NBA teams fall victim to email phishing

Internet fraud tricks new victims all the time, but what you don't hear about everyday is an entire NBA team getting duped. Sadly, that's what's happened to the Milwaukee Bucks, who have revealed that financial data on all employees of the basketball team, including players, has been compromised. Turns out the old tactic of email phishing was used, with an employee releasing 2015 tax records after someone impersonated team president Peter Feigin.

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TeslaCrypt ransomware creators apologize, release master decryption key

TeslaCrypt ransomware creators apologize, release master decryption key

Have you ever done something that you knew was bad, but did it anyway? And then later you felt really bad about it, and wanted to make up for what you did? Well that's exactly what happened to one group of ransomware makers.

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Bank forgoes a firewall, has $80 million stolen by hackers

Bank forgoes a firewall, has $80 million stolen by hackers

We've heard plenty about banks and other institutions losing money to ransomware, which essentially holds a company's data hostage, in exchange for money. These kinds of attacks can be hard to combat and protect against, given the number of people using computers inside of a company. But one bank has learned the hard way that you need to at least take the most basic precautions.

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GozNym malware has stolen $4 million from users’ bank accounts

GozNym malware has stolen $4 million from users’ bank accounts

When the average person finds their computer is infected with malware, it can range from a minor annoyance, to something they need a little extra help to fix. However, sometimes an infection can cost millions of dollars. A new piece of malware has been discovered, and it has managed to steal roughly $4 million from users over a short period of time.

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URL shorteners may be exposing your private information

URL shorteners may be exposing your private information

URL shorteners have been around for a while, and can be rather useful. This is especially true when using services like Twitter, which limit the number of characters you can use. But there are hidden dangers to using a shortener that you might not even be aware of.

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Man charged, pleads guilty in celebrity photo iCloud hacking case

Man charged, pleads guilty in celebrity photo iCloud hacking case

A Pennsylvania man has been formally charged in the hacking case that saw hundreds of private photos from celebrities stolen from their iCloud and other cloud storage accounts and posted online in the fall of 2014. The US Department of Justice says 36-year-old Ryan Collins is facing felony computer hacking charges after he broke into more than 50 iCloud accounts and 72 Gmail accounts. He has agreed to plead guilty, and is expected serve at least 18 months in prison.

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Google webpage encryption made transparent

Google webpage encryption made transparent

This week Google has opened up a new section in their ever-changing, ever-updating Transparency Report for the public. In this new section, google delivers encryption for the masses. Not that they hadn't been moving toward encryption and data security in all things public before - now it's just that they're making more of an effort to show you, the user, how they're doing in their move to HTTPS. This new Transparency Report section is called - appropriately enough - HTTPS at Google.

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Catching up on Apple FBI case: an 8-point timeline

Catching up on Apple FBI case: an 8-point timeline

Today we're rounding up all the details regarding Apple's legal battle with the FBI over iPhone encryption. This includes the one-sentence filing made by attorneys representing Apple this week notifying the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California that their clients "formally object" to an order to break in to an encrypted iPhone. Today we make it simple. Today we catch you up at the same time as we collect the data in one place for ourselves, as well.

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Kingston DataTraveler 2000 Review – Encryption made simple

Kingston DataTraveler 2000 Review – Encryption made simple

Data security and privacy is a pretty hot topic right now. Currently Apple is battling it out with the FBI over whether or not they have to unlock an iPhone. It's nice to know that (at least for now) the data on your phone is relatively safe, if you've added a passcode to it. But not everything important that you carry with you is on your phone. What if you need to carry sensitive information on a flash drive? For that, you need something special, like Kingston's DataTraveler 2000, which I've been using for a little while now.

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Apple speaks with congress, FBI continues fear-mongering

Apple speaks with congress, FBI continues fear-mongering

This afternoon the FBI and Apple spoke before a congressional panel regarding iPhone encryption. This case has to do with unlocking a singe iPhone, says the FBI, one owned by a San Bernardino shooter. After a New York Magistrate Judge (James Orenstein) ruled against the FBI on compelling Apple to unlock this iPhone, the FBI and Apple went to congress to continue to speak on the issue. Apple's arguments have been straightforward. The FBI's arguments have stacked with fear mongering statements aplenty.

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FBI denies Apple case will set precedent

FBI denies Apple case will set precedent

Apple's contends that the FBI's San Bernardino case will have them unlock many phones in the future - the FBI does not agree. FBI Director James Comey spoke with a congressional panel this Thursday, suggesting that Apple's assistance in unlocking the phone of one San Bernardino shooter would not open the doors to future unlocking of devices as such. This situation, he said, was "unlikely to be a trailblazer" for other cases. Apparently Comey had not spoken to the NYPD before the panel.

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NYPD wants access to ALL iPhones (with a warrant)

NYPD wants access to ALL iPhones (with a warrant)

The New York City Police Department says they'd like Apple to unlock every iPhone currently subject to a court-ordered search. Once the San Bernardino doors are broken down by the FBI, the NYPD has made clear: they want in, too. That'd mean every iPhone entered into evidence in a court case and subjected to a search ordered by a judge could be forced open by law enforcement, courtesy of a piece of software they've forced Apple to create. That software would be an entirely new version of iOS which the FBI (then the NYPD, and every other law enforcement agency in the USA) would then install on each iPhone, bypassing Apple's security measures, opening the locks to access data. You might be asking yourself, "why is that so bad?"

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