data encryption

Microsoft patents end-to-end encryption, but for what?

Microsoft patents end-to-end encryption, but for what?

Microsoft has patented end-to-end security for hardware running verified software. This comes at a time at which encryption and software security is a big, important topic for not only traditional computers, but mobile devices as well. Windows Phone 8.1 has device encryption - but only if you're got your device set up at an enterprise level. Windows Phone 10 (or Windows 10 Mobile, if you prefer) has Device encryption built in for everybody. Just like a real good device manufacturer should mean it to be.

Continue Reading

Google webpage encryption made transparent

Google webpage encryption made transparent

This week Google has opened up a new section in their ever-changing, ever-updating Transparency Report for the public. In this new section, google delivers encryption for the masses. Not that they hadn't been moving toward encryption and data security in all things public before - now it's just that they're making more of an effort to show you, the user, how they're doing in their move to HTTPS. This new Transparency Report section is called - appropriately enough - HTTPS at Google.

Continue Reading

Apple FBI case simplified by John Oliver Encryption video

Apple FBI case simplified by John Oliver Encryption video

If you weren't already convinced one way or the other about the Apple FBI encryption case, today "Last Week Tonight" will do that job for you. John Oliver tackles encryption, showing how the situation has played out so far and how absurd everything has been. In this Last Week Tonight, like all Last Week Tonight episodes, Oliver not only takes the case and makes it all simple enough for any person to understand, he drops the mic at the end as well.

Continue Reading

Amazon: Fire owners didn’t care about encryption

Amazon: Fire owners didn’t care about encryption

Amazon has pushed back at suggestions it's selling out Fire tablet users on data encryption, arguing that it was a Spring clean not a security lapse. The online behemoth faced vocal criticism this week over its Fire OS 5 software for its affordable Android-based tablets, which quietly removed support for encrypting data.

Continue Reading

What is a Cyber Pathogen? An FBI invention to defeat Apple

What is a Cyber Pathogen? An FBI invention to defeat Apple

This week the FBI has pulled out all the stops when it comes to getting Apple to unlock their iPhones for court cases. They've invented a term. The term is "Cyber Pathogen." That's not a real thing. They've invented a new term to describe something that cannot possibly be inside the iPhone to convince the government that they absolutely NEED to gain access. It's one hundred percent absurd, for real.

Continue Reading

Kingston DataTraveler 2000 Review – Encryption made simple

Kingston DataTraveler 2000 Review – Encryption made simple

Data security and privacy is a pretty hot topic right now. Currently Apple is battling it out with the FBI over whether or not they have to unlock an iPhone. It's nice to know that (at least for now) the data on your phone is relatively safe, if you've added a passcode to it. But not everything important that you carry with you is on your phone. What if you need to carry sensitive information on a flash drive? For that, you need something special, like Kingston's DataTraveler 2000, which I've been using for a little while now.

Continue Reading

Judge: Apple can’t be forced to unlock iPhones under All Writs Act

Judge: Apple can’t be forced to unlock iPhones under All Writs Act

In a case unrelated but entirely relevant to the San Bernardino legal battle, a New York judge has just ruled that Apple cannot be forced to unlock an iPhone for the FBI under the All Writs Act, something George Washington himself had signed into law back in 1789. In this case, the matter revolves around an iPhone belonging to Jun Feng of Queens, New York. The DEA seized his phone while executing a search warrant on Feng’s home back in 2014. When it came time to search the phone, though, law enforcement was stopped by an increasingly contentious issue: the phone was, and still is, encrypted.

Continue Reading

NYPD wants access to ALL iPhones (with a warrant)

NYPD wants access to ALL iPhones (with a warrant)

The New York City Police Department says they'd like Apple to unlock every iPhone currently subject to a court-ordered search. Once the San Bernardino doors are broken down by the FBI, the NYPD has made clear: they want in, too. That'd mean every iPhone entered into evidence in a court case and subjected to a search ordered by a judge could be forced open by law enforcement, courtesy of a piece of software they've forced Apple to create. That software would be an entirely new version of iOS which the FBI (then the NYPD, and every other law enforcement agency in the USA) would then install on each iPhone, bypassing Apple's security measures, opening the locks to access data. You might be asking yourself, "why is that so bad?"

Continue Reading

App encryption in the dock post Paris attacks

App encryption in the dock post Paris attacks

Messaging apps with encrypted communication are being criticized for allowing the Paris terrorists a way to scheme while keeping security services out. The apps, including Telegram and others, have been blamed before over how they prioritize the privacy of users above providing access for agencies like the CIA and NSA to dig through chats to spot potential attacks such as those in France last week.

Continue Reading

Line messaging app updated with end-to-end encryption

Line messaging app updated with end-to-end encryption

Line, the dominant mobile messaging app in many parts of Asia, has just announced that it's updating its service on all platforms to take advantage of end-to-end encryption. This protects the privacy of conversations between two users, and brings Line up to speed with other popular messaging services, including Apple's iMessage and the Facebook-owned WhatsApp. The new security feature, which Line has dubbed "Letter Sealing," is now available on its updated iOS and Android apps.

Continue Reading

Plex now streams securely over HTTPS

Plex now streams securely over HTTPS

Plex, the media server software that streams your content to different devices in your home, has just announced a big change in the name of security and encryption. Now all streams are to be delivered over an encrypted connection with HTTPS, and even better is that the change is automatic. The company says it has partnered with DigiCert to provide free SSL security certificates to users with media servers, with each one being unique. Users just need to make sure they turned on the "secure communications" option while installing Plex.

Continue Reading

Researchers design new Tor client resistant to NSA attacks

Researchers design new Tor client resistant to NSA attacks

Internet anonymity has become difficult to procure as the NSA is doing everything in its power to keep tabs on Internet activity. One way that people have been protecting their anonymity is by using the anonymizing network, Tor. It was popularly used to access dark web sites like Silk Road, but it can also be used for good. For example, people in certain countries without free speech protections could be jailed or worse for disparaging online claims against the government; Tor provides a way to prevent those users' web activity from being tracked. As it turns out, Tor isn't as safe from the prying eyes of big government surveillance as we once thought.

Continue Reading

1 2 3 4 5