curiosity

Mars Curiosity rover finds evidence of habitable life on Mars

Mars Curiosity rover finds evidence of habitable life on Mars

Today during a NASA news briefing on the progress that the Curiosity rover is making on Mars, scientists have revealed evidence that point to conditions of habitable life on the Red Planet. An analysis of rock samples that were collected by the Curiosity rover shows that Mars could have supported living microbes at one point in time.

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NASA holding Mars Curiosity briefing live at 1 pm ET

NASA holding Mars Curiosity briefing live at 1 pm ET

In an effort to update the general public on what's going on with the Curiosity rover on Mars, NASA will be holding a public news briefing today at 1 pm ET, and they'll be streaming it live over Ustream for all to watch. While it's a mystery as to what will be discussed, our guess is that they'll be addressing the recent malfunction with the on-board computer.

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NASA to apply two software patches to Curiosity rover

NASA to apply two software patches to Curiosity rover

Earlier this month, NASA's Mars Curiosity rover experienced its first major malfunction, with one of its on-board computers experiencing a "memory glitch" and failing to go into sleep mode. A few days later, the space agency announced that the rover had been transitioned to its secondary computer and put back into active mode. Now, a tad over a week later, NASA has stated that it is making progress in its testing and assessment of the A-side computer's memory.

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Mars Curiosity rover is no longer in safe mode, says NASA

Mars Curiosity rover is no longer in safe mode, says NASA

On March 1, we reported that NASA's Mars Curiosity rover had experienced its first big problem, an issue with a corrupted on-board computer that prevented the robot from going into sleep mode. Fortunately, the machine has a secondary backup computer, but the malfunction prompted Curiosity to be put into Safe Mode as a precaution. NASA announced earlier today that it has been transitioned back into its active status.

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Mars Curiosity rover experiences first major malfunction

Mars Curiosity rover experiences first major malfunction

So far it's been smooth sailing for the Curiosity rover on Mars, and it's even taken the time to snap a few Instagram-worthy self portraits. However, NASA has announced that Curiosity suffered its first major malfunction. One of its onboard computers became corrupted and wasn't going into sleep mode when commanded to do so.

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NASA: Mars Curiosity rover now analyzing drilled rock

NASA: Mars Curiosity rover now analyzing drilled rock

On February 7, we reported that NASA's Curiosity rover had successfully drilled into the Martian soil for the first time ever, making a small hole and acquiring a sample of the rock. The sample was to then be transferred to the robot's on-board laboratory, where it would undergo a process that allowed its properties to be analyzed, something that is successfully underway.

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Curiosity rover discovers strange piece of metal on Mars

Curiosity rover discovers strange piece of metal on Mars

The Curiosity rover on Mars has been keeping itself quite busy lately, most recently boring into Mars' red surface in order to find signs of life. However, in its downtime, the rover likes to take a lot of photos, including self-portraits, but this time around, Curiosity came across a strange chunk of metal sticking out of the ground? What could it be?

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Curiosity rover bores into Mars for the first time

Curiosity rover bores into Mars for the first time

NASA's Curiosity rover, which is currently putzing its way around Mars, has just drilled its way into Martian soil for the first time, making a perfectly cylindrical hole on the surface of the Red Planet. The hole is approximately 0.8-inches deep and about 0.6-inches across. From the photo below, the hole looks much bigger, but it seems NASA only need just a slight sample of the planet's dirt.

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Curiosity’s first rock sample target may have been found

Curiosity’s first rock sample target may have been found

It's time to check in with our old buddy Curiosity as it makes its way across the surface of Mars. NASA announced today that the rover may have found its first rock sample, which could provide clues about whether or not the planet could have at one time supported microbial life. We're not sure yet if Curiosity will drill into this rock to pull out a sample - first it needs to make its way over to the rock to have a closer look.

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Here’s Curiosity’s New Year message from Mars

Here’s Curiosity’s New Year message from Mars

Considering how far away Mars rover Curiosity is - and how busy it is chewing through rock samples - we're guessing the exploring robot had a little help from NASA putting together its New Year greeting for Times Square last night. Teased in the final hours of 2012, the clip was beamed up to the huge Toshiba screens above the crowds as part of the tech company's official sponsorship of the New Year celebrations.

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NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover will deliver a “special message” in Times Square tonight

NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover will deliver a “special message” in Times Square tonight

NASA's Curiosity rover has already reached a few milestones, including being the first ever to check in using Foursquare on another planet. Tonight, however, the Mars rover will make an appearance at tonight's New Year's celebrations in New York City's Time Square, where millions will watch the ball drop. The rover is planning to deliver a "special message" on the big screens.

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Curiosity plays peekaboo: New self-shot before 9-month mountain climb

Curiosity plays peekaboo: New self-shot before 9-month mountain climb

NASA's Curiosity rover has set mountain climbing as its New Year's Resolution, with the intrepid space explorer headed up a Martian peak  for its 2013 challenge. The nine-month trek - punctuated with pitstops for drilling and sample analysis - will see Curiosity clamber up the 3 mile high Mount Sharp at the center of the Gale Crater it landed near, further hunting evidence that the red planet might once have supported microbial life. Before that, however, Curiosity couldn't resist snapping another self-portrait - with the mountain clearly visible in the background.

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