curiosity

Curiosity plays peekaboo: New self-shot before 9-month mountain climb

Curiosity plays peekaboo: New self-shot before 9-month mountain climb

NASA's Curiosity rover has set mountain climbing as its New Year's Resolution, with the intrepid space explorer headed up a Martian peak  for its 2013 challenge. The nine-month trek - punctuated with pitstops for drilling and sample analysis - will see Curiosity clamber up the 3 mile high Mount Sharp at the center of the Gale Crater it landed near, further hunting evidence that the red planet might once have supported microbial life. Before that, however, Curiosity couldn't resist snapping another self-portrait - with the mountain clearly visible in the background.

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Curiosity snaps images of space from surface of Mars

Curiosity snaps images of space from surface of Mars

The hubbub surrounding the Curiosity rover seems to have died down a bit in recent weeks, but it's reminding us today that it's still working away on the surface of Mars with a set of new images. Most of the pictures are of the surface itself, but for two of the shots, Curiosity turned its lens toward the sky. If you've ever wondered what space looks like from the surface of Mars, wonder no longer.

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Curiosity drill flaw could self-destruct Mars rover’s electronics

Curiosity drill flaw could self-destruct Mars rover’s electronics

NASA's Curiosity rover could destroy its own electronics systems when it begins using its percussive drill to mine Mars rock samples, the space agency has admitted, a known flaw since before the robot explorer even took off from Earth. The late discovery of a prone-to-failure bond in the drilling mechanism forced the Jet Propulsion Team responsible for the rover to implement a potential workaround, after realizing that should the bond break, an electrical short could zap all of Curiosity's computer systems.

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Curiosity’s whole Mars mission is “history books” worthy clarifies NASA

Curiosity’s whole Mars mission is “history books” worthy clarifies NASA

NASA's teased data "for the history books" from the Curiosity Mars rover has all been a huge misunderstanding, the space agency now says, with the reference apparently encompassing the mission as a whole - not a specific finding. Anticipation was built earlier this month when principal investigator John Grotzinger told NPR that "this data is gonna be one for the history books" and that "it's looking really good"; his comments were interpreted as specific to a set of soil sample results Curiosity's onboard labs had just beamed back to Earth, but NASA says it was all a case of confusion.

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SlashGear Evening Wrap-Up: November 20, 2012

SlashGear Evening Wrap-Up: November 20, 2012

Welcome to Tuesday evening everyone! Today we found out that shipping times for the iPhone 5 have gone down to two weeks, which should be good news for those who have been waiting to get their hands on one. HP announced that Autonomy's "serious accounting improprieties" have left it with a whopping $8.8 billion bill, while afterward insiders were saying that HP never wanted to close on the Autonomy deal in the first place.

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Curiosity finds “history book” worthy Mars data, but NASA won’t tell you yet

Curiosity finds “history book” worthy Mars data, but NASA won’t tell you yet

NASA's Curiosity Mars rover has discovered "some exciting new results" during its exploration of the Martian surface, but the team behind the distant explorer can't yet spill the beans as the data must be re-checked. "This data is gonna be one for the history books. It's looking really good" principal investigator John Grotzinger teased NPR, with the full reveal potentially not taking place for several weeks. However, NASA has confirmed that it's data from the SAM (Sample Analysis at Mars) tool.

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Curiosity Mars rover finds radiation levels safe for humankind

Curiosity Mars rover finds radiation levels safe for humankind

Welcome back to Mars, ladies and gentlemen, as the NASA Curiosity mission continues its epic journey across the planet's surface with a news note that they have found radiation levels totally safe for human beings. This finding is entirely encouraging for the future of Mars exploration as far as actually sending human beings there goes, and certainly doesn't send a negative mark back on the possibility of us living there someday. Of course if you're a fan of the original Total Recall, you don't care one way or another simply for the safety of your eyeballs, but still.

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NASA’s Curiosity reveals surprises on Mars rock

NASA’s Curiosity reveals surprises on Mars rock

NASA's Curiosity robot, which has been rolling hither and yon on Mars in search of microbial life, has revealed some aspects of a rock that surprise scientists. The rock, named Jack Matijevic in honor of a NASA engineer who passed away shortly after Curiosity landed, contains a varied composition profile that was unexpected based on past missions. These newly discovered compositions give scientists a greater insight into the Martian planet's environment and processes.

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SlashGear Evening Wrap-Up: October 9, 2012

SlashGear Evening Wrap-Up: October 9, 2012

Welcome to Tuesday evening, everyone. Earlier today, we found out that Samsung may be planning a Nexus 10 tablet, complete with a resolution to give the third-gen iPad a run for its money. ZTE gave its response to yesterday's allegations that it may be helping the Chinese government spy on the US, and Apple started shipping the fifth-generation iPod Touch to the first customers today. We heard that the rumored 32GB Nexus 7 variant might be replacing the 16GB model, and speaking of the Nexus 7, it received Android 4.1.2 today, which adds a much-needed landscape mode.

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