curiosity

Curiosity back roving Mars in days after “straightforward” fix says NASA

Curiosity back roving Mars in days after “straightforward” fix says NASA

NASA expects to have the Curiosity rover back up and exploring Mars "in a few days" time the space agency has announced, with the fix for the unexpected downtime "very straightforward" according to the mission lead. A software error was blamed for the rover being put into automatic fault-protection mode - freezing all activity - when a file was artificially inflated in size and thus failed a software check.

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NASA to apply two software patches to Curiosity rover

NASA to apply two software patches to Curiosity rover

Earlier this month, NASA's Mars Curiosity rover experienced its first major malfunction, with one of its on-board computers experiencing a "memory glitch" and failing to go into sleep mode. A few days later, the space agency announced that the rover had been transitioned to its secondary computer and put back into active mode. Now, a tad over a week later, NASA has stated that it is making progress in its testing and assessment of the A-side computer's memory.

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Mars Curiosity rover is no longer in safe mode, says NASA

Mars Curiosity rover is no longer in safe mode, says NASA

On March 1, we reported that NASA's Mars Curiosity rover had experienced its first big problem, an issue with a corrupted on-board computer that prevented the robot from going into sleep mode. Fortunately, the machine has a secondary backup computer, but the malfunction prompted Curiosity to be put into Safe Mode as a precaution. NASA announced earlier today that it has been transitioned back into its active status.

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Curiosity rover bores into Mars for the first time

Curiosity rover bores into Mars for the first time

NASA's Curiosity rover, which is currently putzing its way around Mars, has just drilled its way into Martian soil for the first time, making a perfectly cylindrical hole on the surface of the Red Planet. The hole is approximately 0.8-inches deep and about 0.6-inches across. From the photo below, the hole looks much bigger, but it seems NASA only need just a slight sample of the planet's dirt.

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