courts

Apple’s e-book price fixing suit appeal fails

Apple’s e-book price fixing suit appeal fails

The Second US Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan has decided that Apple's "conspiracy among the publishers to raise e-book prices" verdict will be upheld. The trial began all the way back in June of 2013 as brought about by the US Department of Justice. As a result of this ruling, Apple is expected to have to pay $450 million in damages, most going to consumers who've purchased e-books over the past several years. At this time it would appear that Apple's lawyers are seeking additional means for appeal.

Continue Reading

Appeals court rules NSA surveillance program illegal

Appeals court rules NSA surveillance program illegal

In March, the ACLU filed a lawsuit against the NSA, claiming their surveillance program was overreaching and illegal. Today, a Federal Court of Appeals has agreed with that assertion, finding the NSA’s practice of data collection “exceeds the scope of what Congress has authorized”. This decision comes well after Edward Snowden began leaking documentation highlighting just how deep and intrusive the NSA’s domestic surveillance program is. In the ruling, Circuit Judge Gerald Lynch wrote “such an expansive concept of 'relevance' is unprecedented and unwarranted”.

Continue Reading

NTSB rules all drones can be grounded by FAA

NTSB rules all drones can be grounded by FAA

If you’ve got a drone, the FAA might soon be able to ground you. According the the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), the Federal Aviation Administration’s existing rules governing “aircraft” can apply to drones and remote controlled aircraft. In deciding the case, the NTSB’s board said the current FAA definitions “draw no distinction between whether a device is manned or unmanned”. The board also said “we acknowledge the definitions are as broad as they are clear, but they are clear nonetheless.”

Continue Reading

Fitbit data being used in court as evidence of injury

Fitbit data being used in court as evidence of injury

If you sit idle long enough, your fitness tracker may nudge you to get up and move around. It’s a means to keep you active, and one person is now claiming she can’t respond to those vibrations on her wrist. In a Canadian court, one woman is trying to use data from her Fitbit to prove injuries suffered from an accident leave her a shell of her former, active self. Whether or not that will work is another story altogether.

Continue Reading

Yahoo: Government made us give info to PRISM

Yahoo: Government made us give info to PRISM

When PRISM first leaked, the tech companies involved in such a program were a major concern. Just about every major conduit for your digital info was listed, including Yahoo. Now it seems Yahoo’s participation in PRISM may have been under heavy duress, and under penalty of a massive fine.

Continue Reading

Aereo must get ruling to operate as cable company

Aereo must get ruling to operate as cable company

Ill-fated Aereo has lost its latest appeal and must get a judge to rule that it can operate like a traditional cable company, reports Bloomberg. The decision was made by the US Court of Appeals in New York yesterday, and is the latest blow to the company.

Continue Reading

Copyright Office: Supreme Court was right about Aereo

Copyright Office: Supreme Court was right about Aereo

Aereo is putting up a valiant effort, but they’ve been dealt another major blow in their fight to stay alive. The US Copyright Office has ruled that Aereo cannot be deemed a cable company under the terms of the Copyright Act. This comes after a Supreme Court ruling which effectively dug Aereo’s hole for them.

Continue Reading

Aereo CEO responds to ruling, but what’s next?

Aereo CEO responds to ruling, but what’s next?

Ahead of I/O yesterday, the Supreme Court ruled on a case that marked a significant point in Aereo’s future. In their ruling, the Supreme Court effectively said the way Aereo does business violated the Copyright Act. Aereo’s CEO has responded to the Supreme Court ruling, and his full response is below.

Continue Reading

Supreme Court’s Aereo ruling is a knockout blow to service

Supreme Court’s Aereo ruling is a knockout blow to service

Aereo, the service challenged the status quo of TV as we know it, has been dealt a massive setback. The Supreme Court has ruled Aereo violates the Copyright Act, all stemming from the way Aereo operates. The 6-3 ruling all but kills off Aereo, at best forcing them to pivot into a new business model.

Continue Reading

Appeals Court rules location tracking needs a warrant

Appeals Court rules location tracking needs a warrant

A court has ruled obtaining information on the location data in your device without a warrant violates the fourth amendment of the Constitution. In a robbery trial in Florida, part of the evidence against the convicted was his cell phone location data. Noting he made calls around the time and place the robberies occurred, the state could effectively place him at the scene.

Continue Reading

Google ‘right to be forgotten’ ruling may never come to US

Google ‘right to be forgotten’ ruling may never come to US

In Europe, Google is facing a “right to be forgotten” ruling by the courts. That ruling, which lets users ask that Google dismiss webpages about them from search results, is currently being worked logistically by Google. As for when the United States or other countries may get that functionality — well, it’s not so cut and dry.

Continue Reading

Justice Department petitions Supreme Court against Aereo

Justice Department petitions Supreme Court against Aereo

Aereo, which is facing an upcoming battle in Supreme Court and was recently told to shut down service in Utah and Colorado, has a new enemy in its midst: the Department of Justice. In an amicus filed with the Supreme Court today, the Justice Department asked that Aereo's streak of good luck be reversed.

Continue Reading

1 2