court

Apple not guilty in decade-long iPod suit

Apple not guilty in decade-long iPod suit

A jury has unanimously decided that Apple was not guilty in the iPod case raised against them a decade ago. The trial for this case only lasted a week and was marred by accusations that the plaintiffs didn't actually have the iPods covered in the case at hand. While the plaintiffs suggested that Apple's iPod software deleted their music in an unlawful way back in and around 2006-2009, the jury did not agree. Instead, they've suggested that Apple's deleting of non-iTunes tracks was basically just what Apple said it would do - and that this was totally fine.

Continue Reading

iPod court case may be tossed due to lack of device

iPod court case may be tossed due to lack of device

When you launch a lawsuit against a device manufacturer like Apple, it's important that you actually own the device you're complaining about. Attorneys for Apple have contended this week that the two women named as plaintiffs in the iPod court case this week did not own iPods in the time frame the case is covering. This case concerns iPods purchased between September of 2006 and March of 2009, while the iPods these plaintiffs owned were purchased after that time - July of 2009, in one case.

Continue Reading

NTSB rules all drones can be grounded by FAA

NTSB rules all drones can be grounded by FAA

If you’ve got a drone, the FAA might soon be able to ground you. According the the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), the Federal Aviation Administration’s existing rules governing “aircraft” can apply to drones and remote controlled aircraft. In deciding the case, the NTSB’s board said the current FAA definitions “draw no distinction between whether a device is manned or unmanned”. The board also said “we acknowledge the definitions are as broad as they are clear, but they are clear nonetheless.”

Continue Reading

Fitbit data being used in court as evidence of injury

Fitbit data being used in court as evidence of injury

If you sit idle long enough, your fitness tracker may nudge you to get up and move around. It’s a means to keep you active, and one person is now claiming she can’t respond to those vibrations on her wrist. In a Canadian court, one woman is trying to use data from her Fitbit to prove injuries suffered from an accident leave her a shell of her former, active self. Whether or not that will work is another story altogether.

Continue Reading

Yahoo: Government made us give info to PRISM

Yahoo: Government made us give info to PRISM

When PRISM first leaked, the tech companies involved in such a program were a major concern. Just about every major conduit for your digital info was listed, including Yahoo. Now it seems Yahoo’s participation in PRISM may have been under heavy duress, and under penalty of a massive fine.

Continue Reading

Copyright Office: Supreme Court was right about Aereo

Copyright Office: Supreme Court was right about Aereo

Aereo is putting up a valiant effort, but they’ve been dealt another major blow in their fight to stay alive. The US Copyright Office has ruled that Aereo cannot be deemed a cable company under the terms of the Copyright Act. This comes after a Supreme Court ruling which effectively dug Aereo’s hole for them.

Continue Reading

1 2 3