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Corning Gorilla Glass 2 coming to CES 2012

Corning Gorilla Glass 2 coming to CES 2012

Over the past handful of months, Corning has all but dominated the airwaves when it comes to must-have features on a smartphone or tablet device with their patented Gorilla Glass brand of display covering panes - today they've revealed that the second iteration, Gorilla Glass 2, will make its face known at CES 2012. This new version of the glass solution will bring with it increased functionality for devices with smaller form factors, improved touch technology, "connected devices in new application spaces," and even better durable large-format design aesthetics for you curved-corner lovers out there. The big reveal happens next week, and we're expecting some hammers to help us test it!

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Galaxy Nexus uses fortified glass, not Corning Gorilla Glass

Galaxy Nexus uses fortified glass, not Corning Gorilla Glass

Though Corning's Gorilla Glass has all but dominated the review circuit when it comes to must-have features on mobile devices over the past year, it appears that Samsung and Google have opted for a different solution for their next hero device, the Galaxy Nexus. This device will play host to Google's next-generation mobile OS Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich and is set to have a host of powerful features that make it a force to be reckoned with. Corning has assured the public that lo, and alas, the Galaxy Nexus does not have Gorilla Glass sitting on its front.

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Microsoft Productivity Future Vision (2011) released [Video]

Microsoft Productivity Future Vision (2011) released [Video]

In what's becoming a lovely trend from manufacturers all over the map, videos showing conceptual futures where technology has completely transformed the way we go about our daily lives have been emerging - this newest one comes from Microsoft who sees one magical gadget after another, after another. Earlier this month there was a video by the name of "Microsoft Office Labs Vision 2019," now there's one called "Productivity Future Vision (2011)," both of them fantastically edited and made to make devices impossible to make with today's technology seem rather possible by sight.

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