copyright

Megaupload founder Kim Dotcom gives first interview since arrest

Megaupload founder Kim Dotcom gives first interview since arrest

If you've been following the drama centering around Megaupload, the founder of the site, Kim Dotcom, has given his first interview since he was arrested over alleged copyright infringement. Dotcom is facing a litany of charges by the FBI in the US that include copyright infringement, money laundering, and racketeering. The man still maintains that he's no piracy king, and that he will win in court. I can't help but feel a win in court is unlikely.

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Piracy goes 3D as Physibles eye your 3D printer

Piracy goes 3D as Physibles eye your 3D printer

The next copyright controversies will be over physical replicas of digitally distributed objects, it's suggested, using 3D printers and CNC machines to bypass stores and instead print off your own clothes, gadgets and other items. Although currently far-fetched, the "data objects that are able (and feasible) to become physical" - dubbed Physibles by The Pirate Bay - are tipped to be the next hot online commodity, as users share files and design-owners attempt to limit access.

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Megaupload: Seven charged, Anti-piracy stance a sham say Feds

Megaupload: Seven charged, Anti-piracy stance a sham say Feds

Seven have been charged in the Megaupload copyright shutdown case, including site founder Kim "Dr. Evil" Dotcom, as more details on the $500m suit emerge. At least four of the seven have been arrested so far, the NYTimes reports, though the company's legal team has said in a statement that "Megaupload believes the government is wrong on the facts, wrong on the law." The dramatic shutdown of Megaupload and the seizure of around $50m in assets led to swift response by the hacking community, with collective Anonymous taking down the Department of Justice's site, along with the RIAA, MPAA and Universal Music.

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Wikipedia blackout a “broad global message” about SOPA/PIPA peril says Wales

Wikipedia blackout a “broad global message” about SOPA/PIPA peril says Wales

Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales has defended the online encyclopedia's decision to stage a global blackout in protest of SOPA and PIPA this week, arguing "US law, as it impacts the internet, can affect everyone." Wales hopes the blackout - which will see the English-language version of Wikipedia replaced with an open letter encouraging US citizens to contact their Representatives and voice their concerns with the Stop Online Piracy Act and Protect Intellectual Property Act - will prompt even those outside of the US to contact friends and family living there and encourage them to speak up on the proposed legislation, he told the Telegraph, as "a broad global message" about censorship.

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Church of Kopimism file sharing religion recognized in Sweden

Church of Kopimism file sharing religion recognized in Sweden

Sharing is a central tenant in many faiths around the world, but somehow, I don't think this is quite what they had in mind. In Sweden, where piracy is a legitimate political affiliation, a religious group that eschews copyright in favor of freely sharing media has been officially verified by the state. According to the website of the "Church of Kopimism", the Swedish government granted their application for regiligious recognition. The Kopimists worship information, not any specific person or diety.

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Do Universal Music and Google have a backroom YouTube deal?

Do Universal Music and Google have a backroom YouTube deal?

This may be one of the most bizarre things I have read about YouTube and Google. Granted you need a giant grain of salt with this, but if the implication is true, this is wrong on so many levels. Universal Music has been trying to kill pirates of its own artists' work and stop piracy in general and has taken to some extremes in the fight. For instance, it has been trying to kill MegaUpload using censorship in the US for a while.

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Warner Brothers issued DMCA takedown request for content it didn’t own

Warner Brothers issued DMCA takedown request for content it didn’t own

Most of us would expect if a major movie studio is issuing take down notices using the DMCA to stop people that post its copyrighted content that someone would have looked to be sure the demands that they make on infringement is legit. As it turns out Warner Brothers did nothing like that. The company apparently used a scraper to look for keywords and the send automated take down requests.

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Private Copying of CDs and DVDs to be Legalized in the UK

Private Copying of CDs and DVDs to be Legalized in the UK

This Wednesday, Britain will signal its intent to legalize copying of CDs or DVDs onto computers and/or digital music players for personal use. This word comes from a government source speaking with Rueters this Tuesday, August 2nd, 2011. This move will be on a recommendation made to review Britian's intellectual property framework as carried out by Professor Ian Hargreaves earlier this year at the request of Prime Minister David Cameron. Digital music converters around the country realize it's been illegal all this time, say "oh dear me," and continue on with their day.

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Apple clamps down on App IP theft; mulls tougher iTunes password amnesia

Apple clamps down on App IP theft; mulls tougher iTunes password amnesia

Changes look to be afoot in more than just MobileMe, with Apple adding in a new clause to help protect developers against content copying and gaming the review process; end-users may find some frustration in the purchase experience, however, as the company is also tipped to be considering shortening the period for which iOS devices like the iPhone and iPad remember your iTunes password. According to PocketGamer's sources, Apple is flirting with the idea of reducing the current 15 minute period so as to reduce the number of inadvertent in-app purchases.

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The Daily Indexed bypasses News Corp’s iPad paywall

The Daily Indexed bypasses News Corp’s iPad paywall

Back at News Corp's launch of its iPad digital newspaper, The Daily, editor-in-chief Jesse Angelo confirmed that, while HTML versions of articles would be posted online so that they could be shared from the app, there wouldn't be a web interface to access them. Unfortunately for them, developer Andy Baio has stepped in and addressed that, with his new - and potentially short-lived - site The Daily: Indexed.

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