copyright

Pirates suggest Copyright Alert System inefficient with crowdsource tests

Pirates suggest Copyright Alert System inefficient with crowdsource tests

On February 25th, several United States ISPs got together and decided to launch the Copyright Alert System (CAS) in order to stop online piracy. With the CAS, ISPs would be able to detect when one of their users downloaded files illegally, and they would issue a warning to the user. The ISPs call it the "6 strikes" program, where the user would be warned up to 6 times, with each consecutive warning being more aggressive than the previous. Pirates from all around wanted to test out just how efficient the new CAS system was.

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Game dev releases sabotaged torrent to teach pirates with irony

Game dev releases sabotaged torrent to teach pirates with irony

Game piracy isn't just something that affects big studios, and it can have a huge impact on smaller teams; that's why the coders behind Game Dev Tycoon decided to release their own cracked version, albeit with a moral lesson hardcoded for pirates. Fully expecting a cracked copy of the game to surface shortly after the $7.99 Game Dev Tycoon was released, Greenheart Games pipped the pirates to the post and added a torrent of their own. However, what downloaders didn't realize was that the cracked version had a bug the authentic one didn't: players would inevitably run into the effects of game theft.

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Lawsuit attempts to use six-strikes copyright system in case against Verizon subscriber

Lawsuit attempts to use six-strikes copyright system in case against Verizon subscriber

Verizon, which just recently finished its acquisition of Mohave Wireless, has been pulled into a copyright legal spat, with a studio that produces adult films having subpoenaed the ISP for copies of its six-strike alerts against the individual being sued. That's not all the information the studio wants, however, with it prying farther into the subscriber's Internet usage.

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Mega search engine listings appear as files get the axe

Mega search engine listings appear as files get the axe

Kim Dotcom's Mega is off to a high-profile start, but today we're hearing of seemingly inevitable copyright woes for the site. Mega has only been officially up and running for 11 days, but according to ComputerWorld, the website has already received 150 copyright warnings for 250 files. Since Mega lacks a search function and requires users to share links in order to share content (which is encrypted when uploaded), how are these copyright holders finding their content on Mega?

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Twitter releases Q3-Q4 2012 transparency report

Twitter releases Q3-Q4 2012 transparency report

Twitter released its second transparency report, and this one focuses on the second half of 2012, while the first report focused on the first half. The report highlights the number of information requests, government removal requests, and copyright takedown notices that Twitter received throughout the year. In total, the social media service received 1,858 information requests, 46 removal requests by the government, and a whopping 6,646 copyright takedown notices.

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Movie studios’ automated takedown requests target legitimate links

Movie studios’ automated takedown requests target legitimate links

In what may end up becoming a legendary moment of public embarrassment, several movie studios have issued DMCA takedown notices to Google for legitimate content, including official Facebook pages, Wikipedia entries, and legal copies of their own movies. This is the by-product of automated takedown requests submitted on behalf of the studios by YesItIs.org, which has since gone offline, indicating that perhaps the issue isn't as straight-forward as it seems.

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