copyright

Google wins in YouTube copyright case; Viacom intend to appeal

Google wins in YouTube copyright case; Viacom intend to appeal

Champagne all round at Google, as a judge ruled [pdf link] that YouTube is indeed protected by the safe harbor of the DMCA against claims of copyright infringing content uploaded to the video sharing service.  The suit, brought against the site by Viacom, alleged that YouTube either ignored or encouraged copyright infringing clips be uploaded, leveraging that content to build popularity and, thus, make themselves more appealing in the eventual Google acquisition.  Bizarrely, at one point Google alleged that Viacom had uploaded its own content - illegally - to YouTube so as to then demand it be taken down.

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Game piracy costs Nintendo 45% of Euro DS game sales

Game piracy costs Nintendo 45% of Euro DS game sales

Nintendo are blaming rampant piracy for a 45-percent drop in European DS game sales, pointing to so-called "magicom" or "R4" cartridges - which bypass copy protection and allow downloaded game ROMs to be played on the handheld - as the primary cause.  The hacks have previously been a significant issue in Japan, but have more recently spread to Europe; Italy, Spain and France are particular hotspots, apparently.

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Viacom secretly uploaded own content to YouTube, then demanded take-down?

Viacom secretly uploaded own content to YouTube, then demanded take-down?

Viacom and Google aren't exactly the best of friends, and that's because Viacom reckon Google-owned YouTube intentionally encourages copyright infringement.  Problem is, in attempting to prove to the world - and, more specifically, the courts - that YouTube is a "rogue enabler of content theft", it seems Viacom may have covertly uploaded their own video, disguised to make it look like it had been pirated, so they could continue to milk exposure on the site while simultaneously decrying it.

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Psystar agree Apple settlement deal over copyright wrangle

Psystar agree Apple settlement deal over copyright wrangle

In an unforeseen twist to the Apple/Psystar "clone Mac" legal wrangles, the upstart clone maker has apparently inked a settlement deal that will only be called upon should all of their appeals fall flat.  The deal calls for Psystar to pay an as-yet unspecified amount in damages to Apple as well as cease pre-installing OS X onto their computers; however it may not prevent sales of OS-free machines, onto which customers would then be free to load OS X onto themselves using Psystar's Rebel EFI software tool.

Kindle copy to launch in China by end of year

Kindle copy to launch in China by end of year

You have to admire Peking University's Founder Group: when asked about any connection between their ebook device, shown here, and Amazon's Kindle 2, they bravely told those at the Digital Publishing Fair in Tokyo that "it has nothing to do with the Kindle."  Unfortunately they also seem a little confused about their own hardware specifications; asked about the E Ink panel size, and they said it was "unclear".  Happily Tech-On!'s Takuya Otani had brought a ruler, and found it to be a Kindle-like 6-inches.

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Pirate Bay Admins found guilty; get 1-year sentence

Pirate Bay Admins found guilty; get 1-year sentence

The Swedish courts announced their ruling against Pirate Bay administrators Fredrik Neij, Gottfrid Svartholm Warg and Peter Sunde. The group was found guilty of contributing to copyright infringement through their site The Pirate Bay, and were sentenced to 1 year in prison, as well as $3.6 million dollars in fines to be paid to Sony BMG, Warner Bros. and other record labels. The slight bit of good news here is that the Pirate Bay won't be going anywhere, and will remain operational, as the technology is 100% legal.

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Kindle 2 text-to-speech angers Author’s Guild

Kindle 2 text-to-speech angers Author’s Guild

The Amazon Kindle 2's text-to-speech feature - which reads out ebooks on the device - probably isn't the best way to lull your kids off to sleep, being as it's a very obviously computer-generated voice.  However if the Author's Guild has its way, it won't even be around to distract you when your eyes get tired: the Guild is claiming that by including text-to-speech functionality, Amazon are impinging on audio book copyright.

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LA Man pleads guilty to leaking Guns N’ Roses Tracks

LA Man pleads guilty to leaking Guns N’ Roses Tracks

Think twice next time you upload any copyrighted media files to a content sharing web service or your blog. A man has been accused of illegally posting the veteran rock band Gun N Roses newest Album on his web site (antiquiet) before the album went on an official release.

Kevin Cogill from LA was found guilty of violating federal copyright laws by uploading nine of GNR Chinese Democracy tracks on his website. Not a smart move, and he should be glad that the court didn’t made an example out of him. He pleaded a deal, the charge was reduced from a felony to a less serious misdemeanor. In exchange, Kevin agreed to cooperate with the authorities in any future investigations of the case and assisting in identifying the originated leaks.

He will face sentences coming this March; more likely will be put behind bar, look forward to being-somebody-boyfriend for a year in federal penitentiary, a $100,000 fine and five years probation.

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