copyright

Apple accused of Japanese iBooks piracy

Apple accused of Japanese iBooks piracy

Apple has been accused of selling pirated ebooks by Japanese authors in its iBookstore, with titles by high-profile authors such as Haruki Murakami and Keigo Higashino among the texts. According to a consortium of Japanese publishers, "some of the works have been deleted in response to requests from authors and publishers but a majority of them continue to be illegally distributed."

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Oracle Sues Google Over Java Usage in Android, Google Calls It “Baseless”

Oracle Sues Google Over Java Usage in Android, Google Calls It “Baseless”

Oracle has decided to sue Google over patent and copyright infringements, as it relates to Java's usage in Android. It's a decision that has many scratching their heads in confusion over, especially the open source community. While a large market of analysts have already chimed in on their own regard about the situation, it's been Google that's waited the longest to comment. But, now, that's changed, as the Big G has come forward to put their statement on the situation forward.

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Apple: despite DMCA, jailbreaking will void your warranty

Apple: despite DMCA, jailbreaking will void your warranty

After yesterday's landmark DMCA ruling, all eyes were on Apple to see how the company would respond now that jailbreaking and unlocking devices is explicitly legal.  Unsurprisingly, they're not throwing open the doors and welcoming in the iPhone Dev Team with open arms; in a statement to Cult of Mac, an unnamed Apple PR person reiterated that the Cupertino company recommends users do not jailbreak their iPhone or iPod touch, and that doing so will violate their warranty.

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DMCA updated: Jailbreaking, unlocking and fair-use DRM bypassing are allowed

DMCA updated: Jailbreaking, unlocking and fair-use DRM bypassing are allowed

The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) has been seen as a double-edged sword by many, offering small content producers a legitimate way to defend themselves against copyright theft, but also throwing into doubt things like fair-use excerpts, jailbreaking of devices like Apple's iPhone, and unlocking handsets.  Now, in a new set of exemptions pushed for by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), the legal rights of those looking to do those things have been made clearer and - dare we say - more palatable.  That includes the proviso that jailbreaking a device to run an app that has been made incompatible by the handset manufacturer is fair use, as is bypassing copy protection on media (such as DVDs) to excerpt sections for derivative fair use works.

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Google wins in YouTube copyright case; Viacom intend to appeal

Google wins in YouTube copyright case; Viacom intend to appeal

Champagne all round at Google, as a judge ruled [pdf link] that YouTube is indeed protected by the safe harbor of the DMCA against claims of copyright infringing content uploaded to the video sharing service.  The suit, brought against the site by Viacom, alleged that YouTube either ignored or encouraged copyright infringing clips be uploaded, leveraging that content to build popularity and, thus, make themselves more appealing in the eventual Google acquisition.  Bizarrely, at one point Google alleged that Viacom had uploaded its own content - illegally - to YouTube so as to then demand it be taken down.

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Game piracy costs Nintendo 45% of Euro DS game sales

Game piracy costs Nintendo 45% of Euro DS game sales

Nintendo are blaming rampant piracy for a 45-percent drop in European DS game sales, pointing to so-called "magicom" or "R4" cartridges - which bypass copy protection and allow downloaded game ROMs to be played on the handheld - as the primary cause.  The hacks have previously been a significant issue in Japan, but have more recently spread to Europe; Italy, Spain and France are particular hotspots, apparently.

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Viacom secretly uploaded own content to YouTube, then demanded take-down?

Viacom secretly uploaded own content to YouTube, then demanded take-down?

Viacom and Google aren't exactly the best of friends, and that's because Viacom reckon Google-owned YouTube intentionally encourages copyright infringement.  Problem is, in attempting to prove to the world - and, more specifically, the courts - that YouTube is a "rogue enabler of content theft", it seems Viacom may have covertly uploaded their own video, disguised to make it look like it had been pirated, so they could continue to milk exposure on the site while simultaneously decrying it.

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Psystar agree Apple settlement deal over copyright wrangle

Psystar agree Apple settlement deal over copyright wrangle

In an unforeseen twist to the Apple/Psystar "clone Mac" legal wrangles, the upstart clone maker has apparently inked a settlement deal that will only be called upon should all of their appeals fall flat.  The deal calls for Psystar to pay an as-yet unspecified amount in damages to Apple as well as cease pre-installing OS X onto their computers; however it may not prevent sales of OS-free machines, onto which customers would then be free to load OS X onto themselves using Psystar's Rebel EFI software tool.

Kindle copy to launch in China by end of year

Kindle copy to launch in China by end of year

You have to admire Peking University's Founder Group: when asked about any connection between their ebook device, shown here, and Amazon's Kindle 2, they bravely told those at the Digital Publishing Fair in Tokyo that "it has nothing to do with the Kindle."  Unfortunately they also seem a little confused about their own hardware specifications; asked about the E Ink panel size, and they said it was "unclear".  Happily Tech-On!'s Takuya Otani had brought a ruler, and found it to be a Kindle-like 6-inches.

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