copyright

Supreme Court declines to Google’s appeal in Oracle copyright suit

Supreme Court declines to Google’s appeal in Oracle copyright suit

The United States Supreme court rejected an appeal from Google after it lost a copyright infringement case against Oracle. The case originally dates back to 2010. It was then that Oracle Corp., the software company behind Java, alleged that Google's Android OS infringed on copyrighted Java APIs (application programming interfaces). In 2012, a district court found the case in favor of Google, but, in May of last year, the judge's ruling was overturned when an appeals court ruled in favor of Oracle. As the U.S. Supreme Court has backed off, this could be the ruling that stands, holding that API's can be copyrighted.

Continue Reading

Slew of copycat Kickstarters reported for DMCA infringement [Update]

Slew of copycat Kickstarters reported for DMCA infringement [Update]

Kickstarter is the place to go for crowdfunded projects, but from the multitudes of original content arise the occasional copycat productions, ripping off someone else's work. Kickstarter just issued its first transparency report which details all of the requests and claims in 2014 to take down campaigns. Out of the 22,252 68,668 projects submitted in 2014, 282 Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) claims were made on a total of 240 Kickstarter projects. Surprisingly, the crowdfunding company only pursued actions against 44% of those reported projects.

Continue Reading

Canadian ISPs required by law to notify users of illegal downloads

Canadian ISPs required by law to notify users of illegal downloads

January 1st saw a new law, part of the Copyright Modernization Act, go into effect in Canada that requires internet service providers and website hosts to notify their users when copyright holders have detected illegal downloading. When an ISP now receives a letter of complaint from a copyright holder, they must forward it to the customer tied to the IP address associated with the download, or face fines of up to $10,000. The same applies to VPN (virtual private network) services, who must also record customer logs for a least 6 months.

Continue Reading

Sony’s ‘The Interview’ pirated song, claims Kpop star

Sony’s ‘The Interview’ pirated song, claims Kpop star

Just when it looked like Sony Picture's comedy The Interview was able to be enjoyed by viewers throughout the U.S. (and by downloaders around the world) without further scandal or fear from hackers and North Korea, it looks like the movie is about stir up further controversy. Singer Yoon Mi Rae is claiming that Sony used one of her songs in the new movie without permission or compensation, and is now making plans to sue the film studio.

Continue Reading

YouTube Audio Library opened to make Copyright more transparent

YouTube Audio Library opened to make Copyright more transparent

The team behind Content ID on YouTube have just opened the doors to their Audio Library, making it super simple to make certain the content you're uploading won't be the subject of Copyright Infringement. With the YouTube Audio Library search system, you'll be able to search any specific track of music - any track that'll be in the video you're about to upload - and you'll be able to find it. This track will have a listing of its rights, including "If you use this song" rules for each individual piece of music.

Continue Reading

Cox Communications sued by music publishers

Cox Communications sued by music publishers

Cox Communications is one of the largest cable and internet providers in the country. Cox has found itself in the middle of a legal battle with a pair of music publishers after Cox refused to disconnect persistent music pirates. Rightscorp is involved in the case and claims that ISPs lose safe harbor protections if they fail to take action against users on their service that repeatedly violate copyright law.

Continue Reading

EFF fights to keep jailbreaking legal, petitions US Copyright Office

EFF fights to keep jailbreaking legal, petitions US Copyright Office

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) is continuing to make its best efforts at ensuring the act of jailbreaking devices like smartphones and tablets remains a legal act. The organization said this week that it has filed a petition with the U.S. Librarian of Congress and the Copyright Office, arguing that jailbreaking is not a crime, and that it should not be seen as a violation of the U.S.'s Digital Millenium Copyright Act (DMCA).

Continue Reading

Google “wins” Springer news tussle by complying with the law

Google “wins” Springer news tussle by complying with the law

In a somewhat amusing turn of events, Google has just emerged victorious in what could have been a major battle over licensing fees with Axel Springer, Germany's biggest news publisher. Axel Springer reinstated the tech company's ability to publish both headlines and snippets of news, citing plummeting Internet traffic after it revoked those rights for a two week experiment. The almost ironic thing is that Google practically "won" this issue not by fighting for it in court or in media but by actually complying with the new German law.

Continue Reading

‘Google tax’ approved in Spain, search engines must pay news publishers

‘Google tax’ approved in Spain, search engines must pay news publishers

Spain is now among the growing number of European countries to pass intellectual property laws that labels search engines and news aggregators, such as Google News, as infringing on copyrights when they link to news stories. The Spanish parliament approved new laws on Thursday, to go into effect on January 1st, 2015, allowing news publishers to charge a fee each time search engines display their content in search results.

Continue Reading

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12