copyright

YouTube Audio Library opened to make Copyright more transparent

YouTube Audio Library opened to make Copyright more transparent

The team behind Content ID on YouTube have just opened the doors to their Audio Library, making it super simple to make certain the content you're uploading won't be the subject of Copyright Infringement. With the YouTube Audio Library search system, you'll be able to search any specific track of music - any track that'll be in the video you're about to upload - and you'll be able to find it. This track will have a listing of its rights, including "If you use this song" rules for each individual piece of music.

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Cox Communications sued by music publishers

Cox Communications sued by music publishers

Cox Communications is one of the largest cable and internet providers in the country. Cox has found itself in the middle of a legal battle with a pair of music publishers after Cox refused to disconnect persistent music pirates. Rightscorp is involved in the case and claims that ISPs lose safe harbor protections if they fail to take action against users on their service that repeatedly violate copyright law.

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EFF fights to keep jailbreaking legal, petitions US Copyright Office

EFF fights to keep jailbreaking legal, petitions US Copyright Office

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) is continuing to make its best efforts at ensuring the act of jailbreaking devices like smartphones and tablets remains a legal act. The organization said this week that it has filed a petition with the U.S. Librarian of Congress and the Copyright Office, arguing that jailbreaking is not a crime, and that it should not be seen as a violation of the U.S.'s Digital Millenium Copyright Act (DMCA).

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Google “wins” Springer news tussle by complying with the law

Google “wins” Springer news tussle by complying with the law

In a somewhat amusing turn of events, Google has just emerged victorious in what could have been a major battle over licensing fees with Axel Springer, Germany's biggest news publisher. Axel Springer reinstated the tech company's ability to publish both headlines and snippets of news, citing plummeting Internet traffic after it revoked those rights for a two week experiment. The almost ironic thing is that Google practically "won" this issue not by fighting for it in court or in media but by actually complying with the new German law.

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‘Google tax’ approved in Spain, search engines must pay news publishers

‘Google tax’ approved in Spain, search engines must pay news publishers

Spain is now among the growing number of European countries to pass intellectual property laws that labels search engines and news aggregators, such as Google News, as infringing on copyrights when they link to news stories. The Spanish parliament approved new laws on Thursday, to go into effect on January 1st, 2015, allowing news publishers to charge a fee each time search engines display their content in search results.

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EU court rules embedding video is not copyright infringement

EU court rules embedding video is not copyright infringement

A landmark ruling was made recently in the EU by the Court of Justice and the ruling has to do with online copyright. The court ruled that embedding copyrighted videos is not copyright infringement, even if the source of the video uploaded it without permission. The case had been referred to the Court of Justice by a German court and had to do with a water filtering company called BestWater International and two independent commercial agents working for a competitor.

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Moderator: Reddit profited from leaked celeb pics

Moderator: Reddit profited from leaked celeb pics

The leaked celebrity photo scandal has many angles by which to consider it troubling. On one hand, iCloud being hacked is alarming, and that raised eyebrow came well ahead of wondering who was responsible or why they’d even do such a thing. Now it seems Reddit, where many saw the pics initially, actually profited greatly from the event.

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Insisting free-speech, reddit kills explicit celeb pic forums

Insisting free-speech, reddit kills explicit celeb pic forums

Reddit has finally taken down the much-criticized forums which shared and re-circulated stolen explicit celebrity photos, including Jennifer Lawrence and others, though the site's management are at pains to portray it as a copyright issue, not one of free speech. The continued availability of the leaked images, believed to have been extracted from iCloud backups using hacked and stolen credentials, had prompted demands by some that reddit change its stance on what could and could not be published.

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Sorry, monkey photographers, you can’t hold copyright

Sorry, monkey photographers, you can’t hold copyright

The controversy over the monkey selfie has forced the US Copyright Office to step in, clarifying that no photo taken by an animal - even a cute one like this Indonesian black macaque - can be registered. The smiling simian had borrowed photographer David Slater's camera back in 2011 for an impromptu shoot, images from which ended up on Wikimedia Commons, which the British traveler contested on copyright grounds.

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