computing

First full OS X ransomware seen in Transmission BitTorrent app

First full OS X ransomware seen in Transmission BitTorrent app

When speaking of malware, Windows is usually the poster boy for an OS that gets infected a lot almost by nature. In truth, however, no operating system is totally bulletproof. Even Apple's OS X and iOS, usually considered to be tightly guarded silos, have their fair share of intrusions. This latest incident is one such example but this time the affected platform is Apple's much larger Mac OS X. Named by security firm Palo Alto Networks as KeRanger, the ransomware's damage is worsened by the fact that it infected even legitimate installers of the Transmission BitTorrent client.

Continue Reading

Augmented reality is the future our hands are not yet ready for

Augmented reality is the future our hands are not yet ready for

While virtual reality or VR continues to ramp up the hype, a slightly related technology is also starting to rev up its engines. Augmented reality is that other movement that is trying to bring technology closer to our eyes, quite literally too. But unlike VR, AR has a significantly more ambitious goal. Or rather, it is what proponents like Microsoft and Meta are trying to shape it into. Augmented reality could effectively revolutionize how we do computing in the future, replacing monitors and some forms of input with more "natural" counterparts. But while that might be easy for our eyes to take in, our hands might have a harder time adjusting.

Continue Reading

Samsung Notebook 9 ultrabooks launch with up to Core i7 chips

Samsung Notebook 9 ultrabooks launch with up to Core i7 chips

If you are in the market for a very thin laptop that is thin like a MacBook Air, but runs Windows, Samsung has launched a new line that might pique your interest. The Samsung Notebook 9 ultrabooks have launched and they have power and performance while being very thin and lightweight. There are multiple notebooks in the series starting at $1,000.

Continue Reading

DisplayPort 1.4 will let devices output to 8K via USB-C

DisplayPort 1.4 will let devices output to 8K via USB-C

The rest of the world is just catching up with 4K and yet display and TV makers are already starting to get the ball rolling on 8K. Well, that still unborn market has already gotten the thumbs up from an industry standard. The Video Electronics Standards Association, more popular known as VESA, has just released version 1.4 of the DisplayPort specification. Among other things, the new spec makes provisions for driving video output from a computer or mobile device to an 8K screen, over a still young USB Type-C connection.

Continue Reading

Intel tipped to be working on AR headset prototype

Intel tipped to be working on AR headset prototype

The Unreal Reality week continues. On the heels of Microsoft's start of pre-orders for the HoloLens development kit and Meta's second AR dev headset, Intel is now claimed to be working on an augmented reality headpiece of its own, according to people familiar with the matter. The difference, however, is that Intel isn't exactly making one for end user consumption. Instead, it is more interested in selling companies that do make these devices the components inside, a business that is more relevant to Intel than selling ready to use products.

Continue Reading

Reality check for virtual reality – the dangers of subpar VR experiences

Reality check for virtual reality – the dangers of subpar VR experiences

In the next few months, even this week alone, expect to hear a lot about virtual and augmented reality products. Oculus and HTC/Valve are set to launch their respective headsets in a month or two. Google has just stepped up its Cardboard marketing and retailing. Coca-Cola is mulling over recycling its packaging into VR headsets, but Sweden's McDonald's may have already beaten them to the punch. But more than any other consumer technology in the past decade, from smartphones to wearables, VR perhaps presents the most health questions. While the answer are still murky at this point, they all revolve on how the quality of a VR product, both hardware and software, largely determines the effects it will have on your body.

Continue Reading

Paper shows SSDs are unreliable but in a different way

Paper shows SSDs are unreliable but in a different way

PCs today, especially laptops but even some desktops, are starting to use SSDs for data storage. They are, however, also starting to get into servers. The relatively (compared to HDD) younger technology is often praised for its speed and its reliability, mostly due to its use of NAND flash memory instead of physically moving parts and magnetic platters. A new study, however, shows that while that much is true, SSDs fail in a different set of reliability tests that might even be more problematic. The paper chose for its subject the company that eats through data storage devices like there's no tomorrow: Google.

Continue Reading

Raspberry Pi 3: why this one is special

Raspberry Pi 3: why this one is special

Four years after the launch of the original Raspberry Pi, the new Raspberry Pi 3 has appeared with several very important new features. This version of the device - the $35 computer, that is to say - comes with two essential features that've been relegated to accessories until now. Both Bluetooth 4.1 and Wi-Fi are now built-in with this Raspberry Pi 3, freeing up room for more ports for more projects and more freedom for the device on its own!

Continue Reading

Microsoft HoloLens kit launches March 30th, PC app now ready

Microsoft HoloLens kit launches March 30th, PC app now ready

It isn't that unusual for development edition of devices to cost a lot more than what they would in retail form. The Google Glass, for example, sported a $1,500 tag but was promised a much wallet-friendly launch price. If it had launched in the first place. That said, $3,000 for a non-final, development version of an augmented reality headset might be too much to swallow. And yet that is the steep price that Microsoft is tipped to be asking in exchange for being one of the first to try out its HoloLens.

Continue Reading

Raspberry Pi 3 gets 64-bit CPU, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth

Raspberry Pi 3 gets 64-bit CPU, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth

While personal computers have mostly migrated to 64-bit CPUs more than a decade ago, mobile devices and embedded computers have only started their journey a year or two ago. With smartphones starting to carry 64-bit processors inside, the interest in 64-bit CPUs have also trickled down to development boards, including the Raspberry Pi. The latest and smallest RPi Zero is barely three months old and yet now we have a new, 3rd gen, regular-sized board. Called the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B in the tradition of other RPis, this DIY darling actually breaks tradition, with a 64-bit processor and built-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

Continue Reading

TP-LINK RE590T range extender gets wild paint and touchscreen control

TP-LINK RE590T range extender gets wild paint and touchscreen control

TP-LINK has rolled out a pair of new range extenders including the RE590T AC1900 Touch Screen WiFi Range Extender and the RE350K AC1200 WiFi Range Extender. The coolest of the duo is the RE590T with its wild color scheme that looks like some sort of tile mosaic on top and the large touchscreen for controlling the settings and accessing menus of the extender. That screen is 4.3-inches and the range extender can expand WiFi up to 10,000 square feet.

Continue Reading

ARM outs 32-bit Cortex-A32, better for IoT and wearables

ARM outs 32-bit Cortex-A32, better for IoT and wearables

It seems that smartphones and especially tablets are no longer the darlings of the silicon industry. Chip makers, like Intel, Qualcomm, and even MediaTek are now vying for more embedded products, particularly wearables and the so-called Internet of Things. To sweeten the pot even more, at least on the ARM side of things, ARM Holdings has released the design for a new Cortex-A32. Like the Cortex-A35 it announced last November, this "ultra-efficient" chip is designed for embedded and Iot devices. The difference? It's even more efficient than that and is only 32-bit.

Continue Reading

Prev 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Next