computing

Google researchers work around Quantum Computing errors

Google researchers work around Quantum Computing errors

Quantum computers can solve problems that would take an ordinary computer millions of years to complete. It would take not thousands, but millions of years to create solutions to complex equations. Google and researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) have just tackled the latest roadblock that was holding back quantum computing. They created program groups called qubits, which use delicate quantum physics to represent information. They programmed these qubits to identify and prevent calculation errors. Qubits haven't actually prevented initial bit-flip errors, but they prevent the mistake from derailing a calculation.

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Microsoft bends their OS-agnostic mobile keyboard in half: Hands-on

Microsoft bends their OS-agnostic mobile keyboard in half: Hands-on

Two mid-range Lumia smartphones from Microsoft just got an accessory. Really, everyone did. Today, Microsoft is unveiling a foldable version of their cross-platform keyboard, launched late last year. Originally, the keyboard shielded itself from outside damage with a fold-down lid that doubled as a backstop for your tablet or smartphone. The new, fold-y version of the keyboard won’t do that, but it does offer a smaller footprint for users, handy when toting around. We don’t have word on pricing or availability just yet.

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HP Spectre x360 hands-on: When PC makers get OCD

HP Spectre x360 hands-on: When PC makers get OCD

The HP Spectre x360 is, if you're brave enough to play Devil’s Advocate, the Windows notebook you create when you channel Apple levels of obsessive-compulsion. Latest in HP’s high-end ultraportable family, the new Spectre isn’t just a capable aluminum laptop but a turning point in involvement between an OEM and Microsoft: a never-before-seen investment in time, energy, and Very Clever People. In fact, you could well argue that the Spectre x360 is the Surface Laptop that Microsoft refuses to make. I caught up with both companies to get my hands on their collaborative aluminum slab, and find out what makes it really special.

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Gigabyte P37X 17.3-inch laptop gets its game on

Gigabyte P37X 17.3-inch laptop gets its game on

It's been barely two months since Gigabyte launched its 15.6-inch P35X gaming laptop, and yet here it is again announcing a successor. The Gigabyte P37X, however, might not be too big of a jump to deter you from grabbing the smaller notebook. It is, naturally, bigger than the P35X, but, aside from some few highlights, the two share a lot in common, especially in design. That said, if you're aiming to go big with your gaming on the go, this laptop might be worth considering too.

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Lenovo Superfish adware disabled since January

Lenovo Superfish adware disabled since January

This morning there've been some fairly harsh reactions to some so-called "Superfish" software included in Lenovo notebooks. Lenovo has released a statement on the subject, making it clear that this software was only included on "some consumer notebooks" sold between October and December of the year 2014. Due to the less-than-positive impact the software had when it was first discovered by consumers, it was completely disabled since January of 2015 on the server side. What exactly does that mean for you, the Lenovo notebook owner?

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The Web grows up: HTTP/2 is done

The Web grows up: HTTP/2 is done

Given the fast-paced development and progress that we have when it comes to the Internet and Internet-connected devices, it can almost be too hard to imagine how old the World Wide Web really is. That reality check might soon become a topic now that the Web bells have started ringing. IETF HTTP Working Group chair Mark Nottingham has just announced on his blog that HTTP/2 has been approved and is on its way to become the new standard, following HTTP/1.1 which was adopted way, way back in 1999.

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Doctoral student develops ‘Where’s Waldo’ search algorithm

Doctoral student develops ‘Where’s Waldo’ search algorithm

Remember all the time you spent as a kid trying to find Waldo (or Wally, if you're outside the U.S.) in the Where's Waldo books? Well, like almost everything else these days, computers have turned us humans into chumps when it comes to that activity. We can now thank a doctoral student in computing for developing an algorithm that optimizes the search process and identifies the best places on the page to find the striped shirt and glasses-wearing character.

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Raspberry Pi 2 hands-on: first boot on 2nd-gen

Raspberry Pi 2 hands-on: first boot on 2nd-gen

Today we took the Raspberry Pi 2 out of the box and the static shielding bag to give it a first start-up and go. As you'd expect, loading software to an SD card is much the same as it was in the past - except here you're using a much smaller microSD card instead. After that, you've got a more powerful processor and 1GB of RAM to work, so it's time to get quick. Today we're checking in on the basics - getting an operating system running and heading to boot.

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