computing

Qarnot’s Q.rad reuses computing heat to provide warmth to rooms

Qarnot’s Q.rad reuses computing heat to provide warmth to rooms

Almost all computer users, especially PC gamers, would prefer their machines not to emit heat at all. In fact, a whole market exists to offer different, and sometimes almost insane, ways to cool down computers. There are times, however, when heat output is unavoidable, like when it comes to server farms. French computing company Qarnot has designed a way to turn that fact of life to people's benefits. First is to distribute computing power across the Internet instead of locating them all in a single physical space. The second is to reuse the heat from those nodes to provide heating for homes. Introducing Q.rad, claimed to be the world's smartest heater.

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Researchers create breakthrough light-based microprocessor

Researchers create breakthrough light-based microprocessor

Researchers working together from the University of Colorado Boulder, University of California, Berkeley, and MIT have developed a new and groundbreaking microprocessor that uses light rather than electricity to move data at very high speed. While moving that data around very quickly, the light-based processor consumes very little energy making it much more power efficient than current processors.

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Intel has new chips with some odd model numbers

Intel has new chips with some odd model numbers

Intel is just in the middle of its regular processor release cadence but that doesn't mean it won't be launching some new chips in between. It has, in fact, added a total of 8 new processors, not only for its new 6th gen Skylake family but even for the previous line of Broadwell chips. Intel even has two new ultra-low voltage Celeron processors. The list, however, is populated by six chips whose model numbers are either rare or, in one case, has never been seen before.

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Two new system can help driverless cars see better

Two new system can help driverless cars see better

Self-driving cars, in order to perform their seemingly magical feats of technological marvel, need to be able to answer three critical questions: where the car is, what's around the car, and what should the car do next based on the first two questions. That third question can be sufficiently answered by complex algorithms and software. Two different but related researches at the University of Cambridge are seeking to answer the other two.

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LG outs massive hi-res monitors, laptop to woo gamers, creatives

LG outs massive hi-res monitors, laptop to woo gamers, creatives

CES 2016 is just around the corner, which means we are on the verge of seeing the latest innovations, and even crazy experiments, in the world of consumer electronics. Like it's custom, LG is pre-announcing what it has in store, leaving more time to just play around with its latest toys. For this round, it is revealing a few new monitors and, amusingly, a laptop to entice gamers and professionals with their ultrawide sizes, 4K resolutions, and lightweight builds.

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Microsoft Philanthropies revealed to help empower others

Microsoft Philanthropies revealed to help empower others

This week Microsoft reminded the public that their mission, as stated by CEO Satya Nadella, was to "Empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more." As such, Microsoft has revealed "Microsoft Philanthropies", an organization that expands the company's commitment to their own corporate philanthropy.

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Why Banksy just painted Steve Jobs

Why Banksy just painted Steve Jobs

Syrian refugees are being downtrodden by Republican leaders and presidential candidates aplenty. Rogue graffiti artist Banksy has something to say about that. In a painting in the Jungle refugee camp in the French port of Calais, Banksy painted a portrait of Jobs holding a sack and carrying an old-school Apple computer. Something like a shortened Color Classic. And why would Banksy paint Steve Jobs in a refugee camp, you might ask?

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NYU teaches machines to learn like humans

NYU teaches machines to learn like humans

Scientists at New York University work with machines that'll soon learn like humans, dramatically shortening the time it takes for a robot to adapt. Creativity is what they're teaching, and the robot apocalypse is nearly upon us. Brenden Lake, the paper's lead author and Moore-Sloan Data Science Fellow at New York University, suggests that "this work points to promising methods to narrow the gap for other machine learning tasks."

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