computing

Acer C910 Chromebook adds faster chip option

Acer C910 Chromebook adds faster chip option

Acer has injected a little extra grunt into its C910 Chromebook, throwing a faster Core i5 processor at the 15.6-inch notebook. The new model fleshes out a range generally under-served in Chrome OS machines, with a larger screen than the majority of notebooks running Google's cloud-centric platform. Previously, Acer only offered the C910 with a choice of Intel Celeron and Core i3 chips, but even with the new, more potent silicon under the hood, is promising as much as eight hours use on a single charge.

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DIGITS DevBox detailed by NVIDIA with Titan X inside

DIGITS DevBox detailed by NVIDIA with Titan X inside

A high-powered developer-only computer, DIGITS DevBox, has been revealed by NVIDIA this week with the NVIDIA GeForce GTX Titan X graphics processor inside. In fact there are four Titan X cards inside, and every component in the DIGITS DevBox has been optimized by the company to deliver what NVIDIA CEO and co-founder Jen-Hsun Huang described as "highly efficient performance for the toughest deep learning research." This mating domes with the DIGITS software package, as well, including Caffe, Theano, Torch, and cuDNN 2.0, a set of software aimed directly at deep learning work.

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NVIDIA Quadro M6000 GPU coming this week: Deadmau5 in tow

NVIDIA Quadro M6000 GPU coming this week: Deadmau5 in tow

Later this week we're going to get details on the NVIDIA Quadro M6000 graphics card at GTC 2015. Over the weekend, no less than the musician Deadmau5 himself showed the web that he has not one, but two of these massive cards in his tour build right this minute. Deadmau5 speaks of how he'll be using the cards to both "debayer 6K" and "still have insane GPU power for everything else" with these cards. He goes on to thank NVIDIA and suggest that "tour visuals cometh!"

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Belkin outs USB-C range for MacBook and Chromebook Pixel

Belkin outs USB-C range for MacBook and Chromebook Pixel

Belkin has waded into the USB-C arena, joining Apple and Google in announcing an array of cables, adapters, and dongles, many of which are designed to bring old peripherals up to MacBook speed. The eight-strong lineup won't start shipping until this summer, Belkin says, whereupon it will span a range of USB 2.0, USB 3.0, and ethernet options. What we're still yet to see, however, is any sort of more complex USB-C docking station that could take on the role of a desktop hub.

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These are Google’s USB-C accessories (and they’ll work with MacBook, too)

These are Google’s USB-C accessories (and they’ll work with MacBook, too)

Google has embraced USB-C on the new, 2015 Chromebook Pixel, revealing a handful of accessories for the new connectivity standard alongside the Chrome OS notebook. As well as the Pixel itself - which promises up to twelve hours of battery life, as well as a recharge good for two hours of use off just 15 minutes of being plugged in - there's also a variety of adapters and dongles to get legacy devices up and running. Best of all, since USB-C is an industry standard, rather than something cooked up by Apple or Google individually, it doesn't matter whose branding is on the packaging: the accessory will work with both the new Pixel and the new MacBook.

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Google Chromebook Pixel rebooted with USB-C

Google Chromebook Pixel rebooted with USB-C

Google has revamped the Chromebook Pixel, its flagship Chrome OS notebook, though while the new 2015 Pixel is more affordable than its painfully expensive predecessor, it's still not cheap. The new Pixel runs Chrome OS on a 12.85-inch, 2560 x 1700 touchscreen, with either Core i5 or i7 processors inside, though unlike the first-gen version there's no integrated LTE option. Meanwhile, just as with Apple's new MacBook, the new Chromebook Pixel uses USB-C.

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New MacBook vs MacBook Air: Battle of the ultraportables

New MacBook vs MacBook Air: Battle of the ultraportables

Until this week, the portable Mac question had a pretty straightforward answer: the MacBook Air was the go-to machine for most. Now, the new MacBook throws a slinky aluminum spanner into the mix. Revealed on Monday, the fanless 12-inch notebook takes what we loved about the Air - its waifish build, premium design, and lengthy battery life - and distills something even more portable from it, throwing in a Retina display and a controversial port decision along the way. Since then, plenty of people have been asking whether MacBook Air or MacBook is the way to go for those on the move.

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We need to talk about USB-C and Apple’s new MacBook

We need to talk about USB-C and Apple’s new MacBook

A lot can change based on your intonation. When Apple says "the new MacBook only has one port!" it means it as a compliment. The reaction many had to the new ultraportable was the same phrase, but voiced in unhappy astonishment instead: even with the wealth of wireless options out there, you still can't quite escape cables. USB-C is more than just a smaller USB port, but it's easy to get distracted by eighty dollar dongles and questions over what Apple's new connector-of-choice means for the existing peripherals on your desk or in your bag.

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Google researchers work around Quantum Computing errors

Google researchers work around Quantum Computing errors

Quantum computers can solve problems that would take an ordinary computer millions of years to complete. It would take not thousands, but millions of years to create solutions to complex equations. Google and researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) have just tackled the latest roadblock that was holding back quantum computing. They created program groups called qubits, which use delicate quantum physics to represent information. They programmed these qubits to identify and prevent calculation errors. Qubits haven't actually prevented initial bit-flip errors, but they prevent the mistake from derailing a calculation.

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Microsoft bends their OS-agnostic mobile keyboard in half: Hands-on

Microsoft bends their OS-agnostic mobile keyboard in half: Hands-on

Two mid-range Lumia smartphones from Microsoft just got an accessory. Really, everyone did. Today, Microsoft is unveiling a foldable version of their cross-platform keyboard, launched late last year. Originally, the keyboard shielded itself from outside damage with a fold-down lid that doubled as a backstop for your tablet or smartphone. The new, fold-y version of the keyboard won’t do that, but it does offer a smaller footprint for users, handy when toting around. We don’t have word on pricing or availability just yet.

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