Chrome

Google to roll out new Chrome safeguard against malicious extensions

Google to roll out new Chrome safeguard against malicious extensions

Google is mighty proud of Chrome's security, something it has taken a proactive stance on. Back in December, the Internet giant put the kibosh on silent extensions, which are the sleeper-cell kind that slip in unnoticed and unwanted, installing by default. This move has been expanded on, with the company announcing earlier today a new safeguard that ensures malicious extensions stay out of your browser.

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WebKit devs ponder how to remove Chrome-specific code

WebKit devs ponder how to remove Chrome-specific code

Earlier this week we talked about Google's decision to move Chrome away from WebKit and develop its own Blink browser rendering engine in an effort to speed things up. At the time Chrome developers argued that WebKit had become difficult to deal with and developers often accidentally broke things while working on a project. Google says that Blink will give developers more assurance that when they change something, it will only affect what they expect it to affect.

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Speed matters argues Chrome dev as Google under fragmentation fire

Speed matters argues Chrome dev as Google under fragmentation fire

Google's decision to branch off from WebKit and develop its own Blink browser rendering engine is a matter of speed not fragmentation and control, one Chrome team developer has argued, pointing out that what's currently the de-facto standard has already become a weight around devs' necks. "To make a better platform faster, you must be able to iterate faster" Google London's Alex Russell argues, likening the sluggishness of adding and tweaking WebKit features to the inefficiency of using an old computer when newer, faster ones are available. As a bonus, he points out, developers will be less likely to inadvertently break something when modifying the Blink engine, a situation Russell says can often occur when dealing with WebKit.

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Chromium announces new open source rendering engine project Blink

Chromium announces new open source rendering engine project Blink

WebKit makes the web go 'round, and yet it is soon to be joined by a new kid on the block: Blink, which was announced on Chromium's blog earlier today. Says Chromium, the decision to create a new rendering engine "was not an easy" one, but ultimately good will come from it. Developers don't need to worry, as the announcement reassures that little will change for them during the initial rounds of work.

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Chrome for Android now syncs autofill data and passwords

Chrome for Android now syncs autofill data and passwords

Google has officially updated its Chrome for Android app to include password and autofill data syncing for your mobile device. Those features were available for beta users last month, but now everyone can enjoy them. The app syncs the autofill and password data stored on your computer, further integrating the browser on both devices and making Google Chrome an even more compelling choice for users.

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Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt: BlackBerry User

Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt: BlackBerry User

When you're the Executive Chairman of a company who makes a large chunk of its business surround a mobile operating system like Google does with Android, you don't go around using a BlackBerry. That is, unless you're Eric Schmidt. It was confirmed this week that Schmidt, while speaking at the Activate conference in India to Guardian editor-in-chief Alan Rusbridger, that Schmidt uses a BlackBerry smartphone because he likes the keyboard. If that's not the news of the day in the gadget universe, I don't know what is.

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