chrome os

Acer C720 Chromebook brings Haswell with a C7 reboot

Acer C720 Chromebook brings Haswell with a C7 reboot

If you had a good time working with the original Acer C7 Chromebook last year, Acer is aiming to up the ante for you specifically this year with the Acer C720. This machine is one of a collection of Chromebooks announced earlier this year as Intel brought on 4th generation Intel Core technology (Haswell) to the platform. Here in the Acer C720, the user works with a body that's quite similar to the original C7, but reinforced and beefed up with a collection of features for the real world - like 30cc fluid resistance up top so there's time for you to turn the machine off before a glass of spilt water destroys the whole beast.

Continue Reading

Chrome OS expands with ASUS and Toshiba: Acer, HP also onboard with Haswell

Chrome OS expands with ASUS and Toshiba: Acer, HP also onboard with Haswell

This week the folks at Google have successfully teamed up with ASUS and Toshiba to make the number of top-tier manufacturers working with Chrome OS reach a cool six. New products announced this week with Intel's 4th Generation Haswell processor technology (so far) include a new ASUS Chromebox, an unnamed Toshiba Chromebook, HP Chromebook14, and another new Acer Chromebook. This relative gush of devices is a good sign that Google's prediction of the long-lasting nature of Chrome OS, the web-based OS, will be around for the foreseeable future.

Continue Reading

Haswell Chromebooks claim 2x battery life of previous generation

Haswell Chromebooks claim 2x battery life of previous generation

There can be little doubt that the low-cost computer universe has begun to accept Chrome OS into its life, especially given today's confirmation by Intel that a new generation of Chromebooks will be working with Haswell. This is Intel's 4th Generation core technology, and as Intel and Google have made clear, it's expected that this line of products will bring both a measure of increased performance and an improvement on battery life by more than 2x previous generations.

Continue Reading

Chrome Apps go near-native on Windows and Chrome OS

Chrome Apps go near-native on Windows and Chrome OS

Chrome is celebrating its fifth birthday today, and amidst the fan fare is a new announcement: Chrome Apps have gone (near) native on Windows and Chrome OS, gaining a launcher and allowing for use on desktops in the same way apps are used on a tablet or smartphone. The "new breed of Chrome Apps" are available now, with Google promising Linux and Mac support soon.

Continue Reading

Chromecast iOS setup app arrives in the App Store

Chromecast iOS setup app arrives in the App Store

Google may have released the Chromecast with support for Android and iOS, however it wasn't until today that a setup app arrived in the iTunes App Store. This didn't mean that iOS users were left waiting for the app, but it should make the setup process a bit easier for some. If nothing else, it means iOS users will no longer need a web browser to get the Chromecast up and running on their home network.

Continue Reading

Chromecast turnkey app for all videos in development by Koush

Chromecast turnkey app for all videos in development by Koush

Developer Koushik Dutta is creating at least one app for Android devices aimed at allowing any and all video to be "cast" from a mobile device's gallery to Chromecast. The Chromecast device is currently sold out in many areas of the internet and in stores across the country due to its relatively low cost and super-basic functionality with essentially every modern television (with an HDMI port, that is). Koush is aiming to expand this device's abilities from YouTube and Netflix out to a whole lot wider set of media bits and pieces in the very near future.

Continue Reading

SlashGear 101: What is Chromecast?

SlashGear 101: What is Chromecast?

Google's Chromecast device is a Web media player, introduced by the company just a bit over a year after they first showed of a machine with very similar capabilities: the Nexus Q. Where the Nexus Q came into play as a bocce-ball-sized TV "box", Chromecast is the size of a USB dongle, small enough to fit in your pocket. It connects through a television's full-sized HDMI port and you'll be able to pull it up with the input button on your television remote, the same as you would a DVD player.

Continue Reading