chrome os

Chrome Remote Desktop for Android coming soon: Splashtop beware

Chrome Remote Desktop for Android coming soon: Splashtop beware

Down in the depths of the testing arena for Google's Chrome known as Chromium, you'll find the first whispers of "Chromoting", aka Chrome Remote Desktop for Android - connecting the two worlds with a mirrored interface. While the directories themselves aren't especially telling for the lay person, you'll find the concept a bit more enthralling if you're interested in controlling your computer from your smartphone from any location you may roam.

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Chrome app launcher for Windows out of beta: why you want it

Chrome app launcher for Windows out of beta: why you want it

This week the folks at Google appear to have released the full version of the "Chrome App Launcher" for Windows machines. Though you'll only be able to work with this app on Windows 7 and Windows 8 - not RT at the moment - you'll find the functionality to be - perhaps - a bit liberating if you're used to working with Google services on the regular. While this isn't a return to the Start button, by any means, Google does make it easy here to keep you in the fold.

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Pixels rejoice: native Microsoft Word and Excel file editing arrive on Chrome OS

Pixels rejoice: native Microsoft Word and Excel file editing arrive on Chrome OS

Those paying close attention to Google's pre-final releases of the operating system iteration of Google's Chrome will have noticed the addition of some rather important abilities to Chromium code. Noting the discovery of this addition well before Google made such a thing public was developer François Beaufort. As a Google open-source evangelist himself, Beaufort was more than a little joyous to find the words in code as follows: “Improved Quickoffice editing about:flag.”

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AMD wants to make chips for Android and Chrome OS

AMD wants to make chips for Android and Chrome OS

Be prepared to see mobile devices and laptops running Android and Chrome OS using AMD chips under the hood. It's reported that the chip maker is open to designing and developing chips that are catered to support Android and Chrome OS. AMD will still be committed to Windows machines, but they hope to expand more into mobile territory in the future.

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Samsung tipped to bring big.LITTLE ARM power to Chromebook

Samsung tipped to bring big.LITTLE ARM power to Chromebook

With the Samsung GALAXY S 4 in consumer hands internationally, fully stocked with Exynos OctaCore processors, so too has a new Chromebook been tipped with the same technology. While the big.LITTLE ARM processor architecture suggested for this next-generation machine has been implemented on the GALAXY S 4 (the international edition, that is) for a split between obvious "big" and "little" tasks, its usage in Chrome may be a bit less obvious. This device could very well be introduced at the June event teased by Samsung as well.

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HP Pavilion 14 Chromebook Review

HP Pavilion 14 Chromebook Review

HP has officially entered into the Chromebook market with their new $329 Pavilion 14 Chromebook. As a laptop, it doesn’t deviate too far from HP standards, and it still sports the same curves and style that you’d expect out of a laptop from the company. Plus, despite being a Chromebook, it feels more like a traditional Windows laptop with it’s fairly spacious keyboard and trackpad, along with the 14-inch display. However, looks aren’t everything, and it’s the internal hardware and performance that can make or break a notebook. Is the Pavilion 14 worthy of a spot on your college laptop shortlist for the upcoming school year? Let’s find out.

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Google I/O 2013 on-site Wrap-up: Glass, Developers, and Services on tap

Google I/O 2013 on-site Wrap-up: Glass, Developers, and Services on tap

It's a return to form here at Google I/O 2013, with none other than Google’s own Vice President of Android Product Management Hugo Barra letting us know that he'd personally fought hard for a more developer-focused single keynote address. As past years had been notably more consumer and product-focused than 2013, it's not a flash-bang the company has gone for here, it's a return to form: Google I/O in its purest form.

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Google I/O and the year of the Context Ecosystem

Google I/O and the year of the Context Ecosystem

We went into Google I/O hoping for hardware and gadgetry; instead, we got three and a half hours of software and services - gaming, messaging, Larry Page wistfully envisaging a geeky utopia. You can perhaps excuse us for getting carried away in our expectations. I/O 2012 was a huge spectacle, with lashings of shiny new hardware only overshadowed by skydiving Glass daredevils and Sergey Brin looking moody on a rooftop. In contrast, 2013's event brought things a whole lot closer back to the developer-centric gathering that the show had originally been established as. Glass was conspicuous by its on-stage absence, and the new Nexus tablets that had been rumored were also no-shows; the emphasis was firmly on how the components of Google's software portfolio were being refined as the mobile and desktop battles waged on.

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The New Google Maps hands-on with personalized results

The New Google Maps hands-on with personalized results

This week Google I/O 2013's single keynote session focused not just on Chrome and Android, but on Google Maps as well. In an update that Google simply calls "The new Google Maps" and won't be available to all users until later this year. Developers attending Google I/O 2013 as well as those that get early invites to the system will be able to take part in the roll-out first: here Google begins to truly integrate their smart search results and their maps systems, here that Google's promise that the map itself will become the user interface.

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