chrome os

CrossOver for Android on Chromebooks run Windows apps, games

CrossOver for Android on Chromebooks run Windows apps, games

In the future, a Chromebook might be the only computing device you'll ever need. Well, maybe together with a mid-range smartphone. Google has recently added official and fast-running Android app support to at least three Chromebooks and, unsurprisingly, some people are taking that to the extreme. Take for example the folks at CrossWeaver, developers of the CrossOver software, who just successfully got a game launched from a Windows version of Steam running through the Android version of CrossOver running on Chrome OS on a Chromebook. Yes, OS-ception at its finest.

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Acer R11, 2015 Chromebook Pixel now getting Google Play update

Acer R11, 2015 Chromebook Pixel now getting Google Play update

Last month, Google rolled out version 53 of Chrome OS in its developer channel that signaled the start of the promised Android app support for Chromebooks. Back then, the ASUS Chromebook Flip was the sole beneficiary of that update, just one of three promised Chromebooks to get support. Now it seems that the other two are finally getting their day. Although not yet official, multiple users are chiming in to gleefully share that their Acer R11 and Chromebook Pixel (2015) have just gotten an update that finally enables Google Play support for their devices.

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ASUS C301SA Chromebook on pre-order, 4GB RAM, 64GB storage

ASUS C301SA Chromebook on pre-order, 4GB RAM, 64GB storage

Chromebooks are about to become en vogue again. That is, when Google gets around to rolling out Android app support for all models. Perhaps preparing for that day, ASUS is bringing out a new Chromebook that almost seems designed with that exact scenario in mind. The C301SA Chromebook is a 13.3-inch portable that boasts of 4 GB of RAM and 64 GB of storage, some of the highest you'll see in this device class and price tier, ready to support a good many Android apps installed from Google Play Store on Chrome OS.

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Chrome OS is finally getting a storage manager

Chrome OS is finally getting a storage manager

Now that Chrome OS has been updated with the ability to run Android software like apps and games, Google seems to be seems to be testing a new storage manager, letting users see how their storage space is being used and what's taking up the most space. The feature is simple, as you'd expect, clearly showing a device's total capacity, amount of space used, and remaining free space, along with how much is being used by downloads and offline files.

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Chrome OS dev 53 update brings the promised Google Play Store

Chrome OS dev 53 update brings the promised Google Play Store

It seems that the promised day for Chome OS users has finally arrived. At least for those users who happen to own an ASUS Chromebook Flip and are running the experimental dev version of the OS. Reports are coming in that the latest version 53 of the dev channel is greeting them with a surprise welcome message announcing the arrival of Google Play Store on their Chromebook. There are still some rough edges and unanswered questions, but for some lucky users, it's the start of a renewed friendship with their Chromebooks.

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Google video details running Android apps on Chromebook

Google video details running Android apps on Chromebook

Chromebooks are one of the most cost effective ways to get into the computer realm and as such, many parents on a budget have resorted to Chromebooks for a first computing device for kids. Many schools are also relying on Chromebooks in classrooms and libraries rather than thin clients or Windows machines. One thing that has been missing from the Chromebook is access to a glut of apps and software supporting the Chromebook ecosystem. That changed at Google I/O.

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Vysor now lets Android mirror remotely, and it’s awesome

Vysor now lets Android mirror remotely, and it’s awesome

Chrome app Vysor now allows users to build their own Android device farm - remotely. Just what you've always wanted. That is assuming you're the sort of person who has a whole bunch of Android phones and tablets and whatnot. Even if you're not, the newest feature on this app allows you to access your Android phone's fully interactive screen via your PC or Mac or Chromebook both through a USB cord remotely and through any computer connected via a shared link. Easy peasy.

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Chromecast in Google Home should come as no surprise

Chromecast in Google Home should come as no surprise

It's suddenly become newsworthy that Google Home, the company's "first" smart home product, uses the brain of Chromecast to function. But why? We've already showed you the source of that information - not that it matters all that much. Google has been working on this same project for years - it's just had a different name at its different levels of inception. It was (and is) part of the Google On community, which runs Weave connections to other Brillo devices, which are related to Chromecast, which was originally called Nexus Q. It's all part of the same initiative.

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Expect Play-focused Chromebooks when Android app support arrives

Expect Play-focused Chromebooks when Android app support arrives

Android apps on Chromebooks will arrive with brand new hardware and the possibility of much more expensive software, Google has said. The news today that Google is bringing Android app support to Chromebook also brings the promise of new Chromebook devices; while there's no specific news to share at I/O 2016, the company said, when Android apps arrive later in the year it'll be accompanied by "new hardware built with the Play store in mind," Kan Liu, director of product management for Chrome OS, said.

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Android apps on Chrome OS how-to and release schedule revealed

Android apps on Chrome OS how-to and release schedule revealed

This morning at Google I/O 2016 the company showed Chrome OS's newest ability - running Android apps via Google Play. In this, Google expands the reach of Android apps to a whole new cross-section of laptop users and Chrome OS-lovers, making way for new Android apps for personal, work, and/or educational use. Google has outlined the ways and means for developers to start testing apps now. You'll need one of several types of Chromebooks to make this work - at first.

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Android apps on Chrome release starts today

Android apps on Chrome release starts today

Today is the day for Chrome OS users - Android apps will be coming to the platform via Google Play imminently. This announcement came from Google's Google I/O website this afternoon after the main keynote was completed - appearing, as it were, to show how Google mentioned such an update in said keynote. They didn't, but it's likely they were meant to - either way, the result is the same. Google Play on Chrome OS, enabling hordes of Android apps to approach the desktop machines on the go.

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Chrome OS could soon have full Google Play Store support

Chrome OS could soon have full Google Play Store support

To many, it didn't make sense for Google to have different but related and practically competing operating systems. Some of those wished the two would merge, for the benefit of all but mostly for the Chrome OS users. Nearly two years ago, Google stirred things up when it officially supported running a handful of Android apps on Chrome OS, followed by silence. Things heated up again in the Alphabet reorganization but Google quickly shot down rumors of a Chrome-Android merger. Now, however, there might be evidence that Google is further bridging the gap, providing the full Play Store experience on Chrome OS.

Technically, the two OS are very different, except for a shared Linux base and some Google technologies like Chrome. Both, however, could benefit from the other's features. Android, for one, could learn a thing or two about window management and treating web apps as first class citizens. Chrome OS, on the other hand, needs the wealth of popular apps available on Android.

Google partly conceded to the latter in September when it launched ARC, the App Runtime for Chrome that allowed a few Android apps, selected by Google, to run on Chrome. That list started with Evernote, Vine, Sight Words, and Duo Lingo, eventually expanding to a few more, but never embracing the hundreds available on Android. Of course, there were a few attempts to give users that ability, but those were inconvenient at best, buggy at worst. In short, it was technically possible but needed Google's help in opening it up to the whole universe of Android apps. And it seems it finally will.

A user accidentally stumbled on a Chrome OS setting that would have enabled Android apps to run on the Chromebook. The setting quickly disappeared but not before a screenshot was taken. Naturally, dozens volunteered for the treasure hunt and indeed discovered placeholder text for the feature. If enabled, it would ask the user's permission to setup Google Play Store on the Chromebook to access millions of apps and games. Sadly, there is no "Hell Yeah!" button.

The feature is largely inactive for now but we could be given the full Monty this coming Google I/O. Even if it is prayer answered for some, it's still curious to see how Google will manage this strategy. Given how more Chromebooks, and even Chromeboxes and Chromebases, are coming out, Google will hardly kill off Chrome OS anytime soon. On the other hand, Android is set to receive more multi-window features in Android N, which could put it on par with Chrome OS. The two are ironically getting closer together, yet still not the same. Sounds familiar?

VIA: XDA

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