chip

AMD’s Radeon HD 6700 Series Specs Leak Into the Wild, Offer Twice the Power

AMD’s Radeon HD 6700 Series Specs Leak Into the Wild, Offer Twice the Power

On a Chinese-based website called Chiphell, details on AMD's upcoming Radeon HD 6700 Series graphics cards broke cover, offering up pretty much every bit of detail that people would be interested in, all in an organized fashion. The new series is set to replace the Radeon 5700 series, and AMD (at least on the leaked image) says that the new series will offer up "twice the horsepower" compared to the previous chips.

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SanDisk’s 64GB SSD is Smaller Than a Postage Stamp

SanDisk’s 64GB SSD is Smaller Than a Postage Stamp

Even as devices get smaller and thinner, one of the things keeping them from getting too small or thin are the components inside. For example, memory. Despite the fact hard drives (HD) and solid state drives (SSD) are already pretty small, we need them to get smaller if we want even smaller gadgets and toys. We just didn't expect it to get this small. SanDisk has officially unveiled their new 64GB SSD, which is smaller than a postage stamp.

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AMD receives WHQL certification on first day of Windows 7 program

AMD receives WHQL certification on first day of Windows 7 program

AMD announced today that their Windows 7 graphics driver has been certified by Microsoft on the very first day of the latter company's program that tests compatibility with the new operating system. The certification was given for the Windows Hardware Quality Lab or WHQL and is meant to indicate a driver is compatible with both Windows Vista and Windows 7.

This is good timing, considering AMD will be releasing their ATI Catalyst 9.5 by the end of the month. So, people that use ATI Radeon HD 2000, 3000 and 4000 series graphics cards can rest assured the new software will make them work completely with Windows 7.

Apparently, this also allows ATI Stream technology. The WHQL certification comes on the very first day of Microsoft opening their certification program. Nice way to jump in there with your graphics driver first, AMD!

Toshiba shipping 32 nm NAND flash already

Toshiba shipping 32 nm NAND flash already

Just two months ago we were talking about Toshiba and their new 32 nm NAND flash memory, and though it was supposed to not see consumers' hands until the fall, it's now available in a limited capacity.

The flash memory will be available for mass consumption by July. The new process employed here uses a 32-gigabit chip, which is 4GB, and when stacked 8 tall, you end up with 32GB of total memory in one tiny space.

While we don't know who will receive the larger flash memory first, it does seem likely that Toshiba will be providing the memory for the iPhone 3.0. The company also notes that USB storage with the new memory capacity will be their first products to carry the 32 nm chip.

[via Engadget]

IBM and partners show off 28nm chip

IBM and partners show off 28nm chip

IBM and several of their partners such as Infineon, Samsung, STMicroelectronics and Chartered Semiconductor are working together to create a 28-nm chip that requires less power and features a high-k metal gate bulk complementary metal oxide, so says an announcement released yesterday.

This new chip would be mostly used in portable devices like MIDs. What's really great about these new chips is that they will use 20% less power yet gain 40% in performance when compared to the current 45nm chips.

What's particularly useful about this is that those using 32nm chips will be able to transition to the 28nm ones easily, without a complete overhaul of the system. Production is expected to begin sometime next year.

Graphene may be used for 1,000GHz chips

Graphene may be used for 1,000GHz chips

Graphene might be the next material of choice for making processor chips, according to an MIT report. In fact, Graphene, a substance discovered in 2004 that consists of pure carbon, could allow for faster speeds than ever thought possible.

The current research shows that a frequency multiplier could be created, which works to double a signal and likewise doubles a processor's clocking speed. Color me impressed! This idea is not new, but it is certainly new when applied to Graphene, which possesses only an atom's thickness.

So, what's so exciting about this? Well, Graphene chips could make for processors that run between 500GHz and 1,000GHz. That's quite a leap from the current 5GHz chips, wouldn't you say? We should see a commercial version of this technology within two years, according to MIT.

[via PC Pro]

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