canon

Canon IXUS 300 HS digicam: 10MP with 720p HD & HDMI [Update: US launch too]

Canon IXUS 300 HS digicam: 10MP with 720p HD & HDMI [Update: US launch too]

If we're blunt, Canon's new IXUS 300 HS point-and-shoot doesn't quite have the appeal of Sony's new NEX pair, but it promises to be a whole lot more affordable (and approachable for mainstream users) than the interchangeable lens models.  The IXUS 300 HS packs a 10-megapixel CMOS sensor and a 3.8x optical zoom, and can capture 720p HD footage or 240fps super-slow-motion video.

Update: Canon USA have announced the same camera, only as the Canon PowerShot SD4000 IS Digital ELPH.  It'll arrive in the US at the end of May 2010, priced at $349.99.

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Canon AE-1 Digital mod rejuvenates classic SLR [Video]

Canon AE-1 Digital mod rejuvenates classic SLR [Video]

As gorgeous camera mods go, this one will take some beating.  An original Canon AE-1 film camera body has been given a new lease of life, after some careful modder injected the guts of a modern 9-megapixel digital camera into the classic chassis.  Paired with a pancake 10mm f/1.4 lens and as many of the original controls left in place as possible, it's a good reminder as to why camera manufacturers keep coming back to retro designs: it seems we just can't get enough of them.

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The Daily Slash: April 20th 2010

The Daily Slash: April 20th 2010

It's only Tuesday, and this week already feels like a rollercoaster. And it's probably not going to slow down any time soon. Either way, it gives us enough juice to get through the day, and we can't ask for anything more than that, now can we? In tonight's edition of the Daily Slash, we've got Seesmic adding some goodies to their Android app, a man's pinky getting stolen, and an expensive phone. And then in the dredge 'net, there's a camera that takes one for the team, the iPhone HD won't have a removable battery, either, and the App Store sees the cartoon light.

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SDHC Flash Memory Performance on Canon EOS 1D Mark IV

SDHC Flash Memory Performance on Canon EOS 1D Mark IV

Digital SLR cameras generally save their images to one of two different types of memory card: the majority support CompactFlash (CF), while others such as Nikon's D3000 and the Canon Rebel XS write data onto Secure Digital (SD) memory cards. The latter are inexpensive and favorable for their smaller form factor and better physical contact surface instead of fragile pins. Some DSLRs, however, have dual card slots, such as the Canon Digital EOS 1D Mark II N or the Nikon D300s. Last time around, we reviewed number of UDMA-6 high performance CompactFlash cards on the world's fastest DSLR, the Canon EOS 1D Mark IV, and we promised to put some Class-10 SDHCs through the same tests. That day has come, so read on to find out how Class 10 SDHCs stack against UDMA-rated CF on the Mark IV.

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Canon XF305 and XF300 pro-spec camcorders outed

Canon XF305 and XF300 pro-spec camcorders outed

After drooling a little over JVC's latest pro-spec video camera earlier this week, it only seems right to pay a little attention to Canon's rival camcorders, the XF305 and XF300.  Each capable of recording 1920 x 1080 Full HD video in MPEG-2 4:2:2 50Mbps Canon XF codec, they have hot-swappable dual UDMA CF card slots, Canon 18x HD L-series lenses and the company's latest DIGIC DV III Image Processor.

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High Performance CompactFlash Benchmarks on Canon 1D Mark IV

High Performance CompactFlash Benchmarks on Canon 1D Mark IV

Being successful in digital photography isn’t just about which DSLR you spend your money on: it’s the memory card you put inside it, too. Over the past few weeks, we’ve been testing the latest high-capacity UDMA 6 capable CompactFlash cards in up to 64GB sizes from SanDisk, PhotoFast and Lexar, intended for the most demanding of professional photographers. We didn’t stop at spec-sheet theory, either; to get the most out of these high-speed cards, we put them through their paces with the Canon EOS 1D Mark IV and top-spec computers to gather the real world performance figures, including an unprecedented in-camera write speed pushing the limit to 58MB/s with the Mark IV. Read on to find out which card tops the chart, and how the newcomer PhotoFast G-Monster holds up against the market leaders.

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