business

Uber CEO charged in South Korea

Uber CEO charged in South Korea

Following closely after word surfaced of troubles in China and Taiwan, Uber has been hit with a pretty severe blow in South Korea, where the ridesharing service's CEO Travis Kalanick was indicted for allegedly violating the nation's transportation laws. Bloomberg reports that an unnamed government official provided some extra details, among them being that Uber in South Korea (and its partner MK Korea) were operating "rental cars as taxis" illegally. This follows Uber's past claim that it was following the nation's law.

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Marriott wifi blocking plan gains opposition from Google, Microsoft

Marriott wifi blocking plan gains opposition from Google, Microsoft

If you're like many of us, a trip to the hotel usually means eschewing the available WiFi in favor of setting up your own hotspot. The reasons for this are numerous: speeds are usually better, you don't like the risks of hotel WiFi, and you can side-step any fees the hotel might require. Marriott was recently fined $600,000 for jamming guests' hotspots at the Gaylord Opryland Hotel and Convention Center, and around the same time it had petitioned for the right to continue blocking guest hotspots, citing security reasons.

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Uber facing pressure in China and Taiwan

Uber facing pressure in China and Taiwan

Uber is facing more backlash, this time in the Chinese city Chongqing and in Taiwan, and the issue is a familiar one: concerns about lack of proper licensing for the drivers, concerns shared by officials in cities across the globe. Chongqing is a very large city, and an investigation probing Uber's business there is said to be the first big critical look mainland China has given the company -- and, as points out Reuters, it follows an investment from Baidu, a Chinese company.

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Comcast, Time Warner Cable hit with acquisition review delay

Comcast, Time Warner Cable hit with acquisition review delay

The Comcast and Time Warner Cable merger has hit another snag, with the Federal Communications Commission reporting that Time Warner had held back over 7,000 documents. The FCC discovered the issue some time this month, with the reason said to have been caused by "an inappropriate claim of attorney-client privilege." After realizing 7,000 or so documents were withheld, the FCC then discovered Time Warner had also experienced a "vendor error" that resulted in failure to provide more than 31,000 documents.

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Report: Apple has 3 billion reasons for their 16GB iPhone 6

Report: Apple has 3 billion reasons for their 16GB iPhone 6

On launch, the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus were found to offer a base-level 16GB storage. Many wondered why Apple wouldn’t up the entry level storage option to 32GB, but the answer was easy: they want you spending more. The next available option, 64GB, is a $100 premium over the 16GB variant, which blindly encourages you to spend more. How much more? A new report details how Apple may earn $3 billion in 2015 from their internal storage play on consumers.

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North Korea’s internet is down in wake of The Interview

North Korea’s internet is down in wake of The Interview

Late Sunday, the 22nd of December, North Korea began suffering a major internet outage cross-country. This sort of internet failure is not common in North Korea, and researchers have suggested that it's very possible the country is under a concentrated DDoS attack. This would be a denial-of-service for North Korea shortly after the FBI suggested whoever was responsible for the digital attack on Sony would suffer costs and consequences. Meanwhile President Barack Obama suggested that "we will respond proportionally, and we will respond in a place and time and a manner that we choose."

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Comcast brings user time scheduling feature to app

Comcast brings user time scheduling feature to app

Comcast is America's favorite company to hate, and it is trying to change that popular view by eliminating some of the hassle customers often encounter. The latest on the chopping block is waiting on hold, at least under certain circumstances. On Thursday, Comcast announced that it had added two new features to its My Account App, one of which allows users to arrange for a Comcast representative to call them, rather than calling and waiting for a representative to become available.

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Uber agrees to pull out of Portland for 3 months

Uber agrees to pull out of Portland for 3 months

Earlier this month, Uber steamrolled into Portland without any heads up that it was coming, surprising both residents and city officials alike. The intrusion was illegal, and was not tolerated for long. Within a couple days, Portland had filed a lawsuit against the ridesharing service and had begun baiting drivers, issuing them warnings under the threat of possible substantial future fines. The tactic wasn't a surprising move on Uber's part, and now that it has managed to catch Portland residents' attention, it has agreed to withdraw its service temporarily, leaving everyone else to scramble.

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CrowdedRocket crowdfunding platform takes off with a bang

CrowdedRocket crowdfunding platform takes off with a bang

This week a new crowdfunding platform by the name of CrowdedRocket was launched - and not 24-hours later it's become so popular, the site is down. "We are experiencing heavy traffic," says the site at the time of this article's publication, "we are working on scaling up. Please try back later." The site works with startup companies and sets itself aside by creating a vetting process. Instead of allowing just about any sort of project jump onboard, they have a set of "thought leaders and influencers" work to see whether or not said project is worth the jumpstart in the first place.

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Apple not guilty in decade-long iPod suit

Apple not guilty in decade-long iPod suit

A jury has unanimously decided that Apple was not guilty in the iPod case raised against them a decade ago. The trial for this case only lasted a week and was marred by accusations that the plaintiffs didn't actually have the iPods covered in the case at hand. While the plaintiffs suggested that Apple's iPod software deleted their music in an unlawful way back in and around 2006-2009, the jury did not agree. Instead, they've suggested that Apple's deleting of non-iTunes tracks was basically just what Apple said it would do - and that this was totally fine.

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