bugs

Android Marshmallow memory leak fixed but ETA unknown

Android Marshmallow memory leak fixed but ETA unknown

If you have been experiencing some performance problems on your Android smartphone running version 6.0 Marshmallow and have traced it down to an uncontrolled use of system memory, take comfort in two things. One, you aren't the only one. Two, Google says that the issue has been fixed. Now the only problem is trying to divine what "will be available in a future build" means in this context, whether that means in next month's security updates or in Android N. Either way, affected user will just have wait for the fix to land on their devices. If it does, that is.

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Apple pulls iOS 9.3.2 update for 9.7-inch iPad Pro, fix promised

Apple pulls iOS 9.3.2 update for 9.7-inch iPad Pro, fix promised

iPhone and iPad owners have been proud of how better the iOS update system is compared to Android's fragmented diversity. With Apple in full control of updates, all supported devices are able to receive updates quickly and smoothly. That last bit, however, has lately become a bane more than a boon, with each update sometimes breaking things instead of fixing them. The latest example of this would be iOS 9.3.2, an otherwise uneventful and minor update if not for the fact that it bricked some 9.7-inch iPad Pro tablets.

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iOS 9.3.2 reportedly bricking some 9.7-inch iPad Pros

iOS 9.3.2 reportedly bricking some 9.7-inch iPad Pros

Software updates are usually made in order to fix problems, not make matters worse. But sometimes even the best laid intentions and plans can end up in a spectacular fail. That is what some owners of the 9.7-inch iPad Pro are discovering right now. After applying what seemed to be a normal iOS 9.3.2 update, they found themselves caught in an endless loop that won't even let them restore to a back up or a previous iOS version. In other words, they're left with a completely non-working tablet.

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Apple will stop deleting your songs with iTunes update next week

Apple will stop deleting your songs with iTunes update next week

For the last week and a half, there have been a growing number of complaints from Apple Music and iTunes users about locally stored music being deleted in exchange for copies available in the cloud. As James Pinkstone, whose blog post kicked off this controversy, explains, the problem (aside from removing music without explicit permission) is that there is a high chance of mis-matching or mis-identifying songs, resulting in original recordings being deleted and rare, alternate versions of songs being replaced with the widely released copies.

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Qualcomm code bug leaves Android open to attack

Qualcomm code bug leaves Android open to attack

Android has acquired, warranted or not, the reputation of being a relatively less secure mobile platform. In some cases, it's attributed to the freedoms that the operating system affords developers and users. At other times, the weakness can be found inside Android's core, like the Stagefright flaw. This time, an equally frightening and far reaching security hole has crept into the Android codebase via one of Google's own partners. In introducing new networking features like tethering for its chips, Qualcomm inadvertently created a way for hackers to gain access to private user data, potentially affecting thousands, if not millions, of Android devices out in the wild.

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Fix Dark Souls III crashing issues with these tips

Fix Dark Souls III crashing issues with these tips

This is the big week for Dark Souls fans here in the US. While the game has been out in Japan for a little while already, the rest of the world is only just now getting access to the game. And so far, it's proving to be a far more difficult challenge than the previous two games, although for very different reasons.

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Malware can hijack Firefox extensions to compromise users

Malware can hijack Firefox extensions to compromise users

Web browsers these days, especially Chrome, use sandboxing methods to prevent unauthorized access to the computer or excessive use of resources. But while that may be true for the browser's tabs and content themselves, that might not always apply to other things related to it, like extensions. That is the problem facing Firefox and some of its most popular extensions right now. Security researchers have discovered that thanks to vulnerabilities in how Firefox implements extensions, hackers can write seemingly harmless add-ons that piggyback on "clean", valid extensions in order to gain access to files or scam users.

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Siri bug gives access to iPhone 6s, 6s Plus contacts, photos

Siri bug gives access to iPhone 6s, 6s Plus contacts, photos

Some iPhone and iPad users swear by Siri, praising how the smart assistant has made their digital lives a tad more convenient. But such convenience comes at the price of granting Siri access to your device and app information. When left unchecked, this could lead to some troubling circumstances. Take for example this recently discovered flaw that would let unauthorized people access an iPhone's contacts and photos even from a locked screen. All because Siri might just be a tad too eager to help anyone who asks.

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TrueCaller exposed 100 million Android users’ details to hackers

TrueCaller exposed 100 million Android users’ details to hackers

While our smartphones have definitely become more capable and smarter, the phone functionality itself has remained locked in the 20th century. There have been many attempts to make the phone app itself even smarter. Google's dialer app is one. Third-party TrueCaller, which is making its way to the likes of Cyanogen OS and BLU Products devices, is another. Yet for all the convenience that the service might bring, one single design flaw potentially exposed the private details of 100 million Android users who have downloaded the app in good faith.

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In the 21st century, computers still trip over human names

In the 21st century, computers still trip over human names

You'd think that in this day and age of the Internet, self-driving cars, and wayward chatbot AI's, computers would no longer have problems dealing with human names, whatever their form. But as some people from around the world have discovered, to their amusement and exasperation, that is plainly not the case. Today's software, especially database software, are still ill-equipped to handle corner cases when it comes to names of real, not made up, people, causing no small amount of inconvenience to those and practically stalling the evolution of information systems.

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Glitch sends Facebook Lahore Safety Check to the whole world

Glitch sends Facebook Lahore Safety Check to the whole world

Following catastrophic events like the 2011 tsunami that hit Tokyo, Facebook launched its new Safety Check feature to utilize the vast reach of the social network to connect affected people with their families and friends. It basically works by sending out a notification asking you if you're OK when Facebook detects you're within the affected area. This weekend, however, some Facebook users from different places around the world were being asked by Safety Check if they were alright, saying they were in Lahore, Pakistan where a suicide bomb killed dozens and injured hundreds.

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iOS 9.3 causing app crashes for some with broken Safari links

iOS 9.3 causing app crashes for some with broken Safari links

Seems like iOS 9.3 is turning out to be one of Apple's more buggy software updates in recent history. Only a few days after Apple had to re-issue a new build of iOS 9.3 after some owners of older iPad models were left with bricked devices, another issue is turning up that results in broken website links in Safari, Mail, Messages, and other apps. Apple's Support forums are starting to see hundreds of posts from users frustrated with the bug.

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