augmented reality

New Google Glass video demos true potential of water-resistant wearable

New Google Glass video demos true potential of water-resistant wearable

Google has spilled a fresh batch of Google Glass details, with a new video detailing what the wearable can do - including video, Google searches, photos, voice translation, and more - as well as showing the latest hardware. The new footage is apparently a far more realistic demonstration of Glass' potential than Google's original concept video, putting a preview pane of the Glass eyepiece in the upper right corner of the screen, and showing how the headset can react to spoken commands previewed with the order "OK, Glass."

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8,000 more Google Glass wearables on offer for creatives

8,000 more Google Glass wearables on offer for creatives

Google has re-opened preorders for its Glass wearable computer, though it's not just a case of opening up your wallet to the tune of $1,500: you'll need to have some good ideas as to what exactly to do with the wearable to qualify. First put up for sale at Google I/O 2012 as the limited edition Glass Explorer Edition, still yet to ship though promised sometime in early 2013, the new round of orders extends the net to developers across the US.

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Vuzix Wrap 1200AR augmented reality eyewear now shipping

Vuzix Wrap 1200AR augmented reality eyewear now shipping

Vuzix has been producing all sorts of video glasses for a number of years. One of the most recent products that the company has announced is called the Wrap 1200AR. These glasses are see-through augmented reality units providing lots of adjustability to allow wearers the ability to overlay video and other content on what they see in the real world.

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Meta plans true augmented reality with Epson-powered wearable

Meta plans true augmented reality with Epson-powered wearable

The augmented reality scene is hotting up, with the promise of full computer-mediated vision for the mainstream and another hint that Google won't have the Glass market all to itself thanks to an incoming headset from startup Meta. The wearable project actually goes one step further than Project Glass, putting a full twin-display digital environment - controlled by two hand 3D tracking - in front of the user, rather than floating notifications and prompts in the corner of their eye as Google's system does.

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Brin: Google Glass Explorer Edition will ship “in a couple of months”

Brin: Google Glass Explorer Edition will ship “in a couple of months”

Google's Project Glass Explorer Edition, the $1,500 limited-edition developer version of the wearable computer, will ship "in a couple of months" Sergey Brin has confirmed, after being spotted wearing a prototype headset in NYC this week. Brin, who has been a significant motivator for Google's augmented reality and wearables R&D, revealed the rough timescale to Noah Zerkin, who recognized the Google co-founder on the NYC subway. The exec also touched upon how many Glass prototypes are in the wild.

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Will Wearables Fuel – or Fracture – Convergence?

Will Wearables Fuel – or Fracture – Convergence?

The candid snapshot of Google exec Sergey Brin, riding the subway on a $2.25 fare while sporting a Glass prototype worth thousands of dollars, has reignited questions around ubiquitous computing. That sighting of Brin is a timely one. Not only is Google's Glass Foundry developer schedule kicking off at the end of January, but several other wearables projects have reached milestones this month; Vuzix brought out prototypes of its Glass rival a few weeks back, while Kickstarter success Memoto applied some extra-sensor balm to the sting of an unexpected hardware delay today.

As each project tracks toward release, however, the ecosystem of more straightforward body-worn gadgetry such as activity monitors like Jawbone's UP picks up for what's predicted to be a bumper year of sales. Still, among sensor ubiquity and the specter of power paucity, the fledgling wearables industry hasn't apparently decided whether it'll face this brave new augmented world hand-in-hand, or jealously guarding its data.

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Sergey Brin spotted on NYC subway rocking Google Glass

Sergey Brin spotted on NYC subway rocking Google Glass

When you're Sergey Brin, you can afford to take a limo through the streets of NYC, though the photo opportunities for your Google Glass headset are probably more plentiful on the subway. Augmented reality enthusiast Noah Zerkin spotted Brin on the downtown 3 train, complete with a surprisingly discrete black Glass wearable, in the latest in-the-wild sighting of Google's head-worn computer.

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Vuzix Smart Glasses M100 hands-on

Vuzix Smart Glasses M100 hands-on

Google's Project Glass may have made the augmented reality headlines in 2012, but Vuzix's Smart Glasses M100 is set to be the first wearable on sale in 2013. Packing a full Android-based computer in a headpiece, with an eye-mounted 800 x 480 display and both Bluetooth and WiFi connectivity, the M100 is at CES 2013 in prototype form, ahead of a launch at "under $500" later in the year. Read on for our hands-on first impressions.

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DIY Google Glass puts iOS in front of your eyes

DIY Google Glass puts iOS in front of your eyes

Google may be beavering away on the last stages of Project Glass before the Explorer version arrives with developers, but meanwhile DIY wearable computers are springing up, some with Apple's iOS at their core. A straightforward combination of an iPod touch, off-the-shelf wearable display, Bluetooth camera and a set of safety goggles was enough for AI researcher Rod Furlan to get a glimpse at the benefits of augmented reality, he writes at IEEE Spectrum, though the headset raised as many questions as it provided answers.

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Google Glass “in flux”: Battery, cloud apps & controls still work-in-progress

Google Glass “in flux”: Battery, cloud apps & controls still work-in-progress

Google's Project Glass is still on track to arrive with developers "early this year," project lead Babak Parviz insists, with the wearable computer still undergoing work to refine the hardware, boost battery life, and develop compelling apps. "The feature set for the device is not set yet. It is still in flux," Parviz told IEEE Spectrum, suggesting that Google still isn't willing to cite specific features beyond the photo/video capture and messaging already demonstrated.

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