augmented reality

Google Glass grabs developer outreach chief from Gmail

Google Glass grabs developer outreach chief from Gmail

Google's Glass wearable division has poached itself a new Community Manager, with former Gmail community lead Sarah Price jumping from email to augmented reality. Price's new role, confirmed on Google+, will see her engage with bleeding-edge Glass developers, who stand to get their hands on the first Explorer Edition in early 2013, as Google attempts to encourage coders to come up with apps suitable for a wearable display.

Continue Reading

Broken Glass: Father of wearable computing allegedly assaulted

Broken Glass: Father of wearable computing allegedly assaulted

Wearable computing pioneer Steve Mann has allegedly been attacked by employees of a French McDonald's after sporting his own version of Google's Glass AR headset, with the EyeTap eyepiece grabbing snapshots of those involved. Mann, who led MIT's Wearable Computers group and has been exploring mediated reality technologies for several decades, claims that while on holiday in Paris with his family he was challenged by staff at the fast food chain, who ripped up his medical documentation about the headset and then attempted to pull it from his head. Mann's system is "permanently attached and does not come off my skull without special tools."

Update: Official McDonald's statement after the cut.

Continue Reading

Google Glass controls and Artificial Intelligence detailed

Google Glass controls and Artificial Intelligence detailed

Google's cautious approach to allowing people to play with Project Glass means the UI of the wearable computer is something of a mystery, but a new patent application could spill some of the secrets. The wordy "Head-mounted display that displays a visual representation of physical interaction with an input interface located outside of the field of view" details a system whereby a preview of the controls of a wearable - such as the side-mounted touchpad on Google Glass - are floated virtually in the user's line of sight. The application also suggests Glass might maintain its own "self-awareness" of the environment, reacting as appropriate without instruction from the user.

Continue Reading

Forget the iPad Mini, we want Apple’s Google Glass

Forget the iPad Mini, we want Apple’s Google Glass

Apple's engineers are experimenting with wearable displays that could one day present an iOS rival to Google's Project Glass, a newly assigned patent suggests, bouncing projected light through specially created lenses. The patent, "Peripheral treatment for head-mounted displays", was filed back in 2006 and granted this week, and tackles what's perhaps the most difficult element of wearables, making displays in close-proximity to the wearer's eyes look suitably distant without causing eye-strain.

Continue Reading

Don’t Doubt Google’s People Skills

Don’t Doubt Google’s People Skills

Google IO opened with a bang last week, spilling Jelly Beans, cheap tablets, augmented reality and more, but for all the search giant knows we're looking for, is it still out of touch? After the buzz of Google Glass and its base jumping entrance - thoroughly milked the following day by Sergey "Iron Man" Brin - attendees have been adding up what was demonstrated and questioning Google's understanding of exactly how people use technology. Geeks getting carried away with "what can we do" rather than "why would we do it" is the common refrain, but make no mistake, everything Google showed us is rooted in solid business strategy.

Continue Reading

Will Google Glass Help Us Remember Too Well?

Will Google Glass Help Us Remember Too Well?

When Google sent BASE jumpers hurtling from a blimp as part of the first day Google I/O Keynote presentation, I was barely impressed. The jumpers were demonstrating the Project Glass wearable computer that Google is developing, and which I and just about all of my friends are lusting over. I had seen plenty of skydivers jumping with wearable cameras strapped to them. Then the Googlers landed, and another team started riding BMX bikes on the roof of the Moscone center, where the conference is being held. Yawn. Finally, climbers rappelled down the side of the building. Ho-hum. The point seemed to be that Google Glass was real, and that the glasses would not fall off your face as you fell onto San Francisco from a zeppelin. But then Google showed something that blew my mind.

Continue Reading

Consumer Google Glasses due less than 12 months after developer version

Consumer Google Glasses due less than 12 months after developer version

Google aims to get its Google Glasses augmented reality headset shipping to consumers within a year of the $1,500 Explorer Edition arriving with developers, the company has confirmed. That consumer version will be "significantly" cheaper than the Explorer Edition prototype hardware, Google co-founder and Glass project lead Sergey Brin told TechCrunch, though this won't be a race to the bottom.

Continue Reading

Qualcomm extends Vuforia augmented reality to the cloud

Qualcomm extends Vuforia augmented reality to the cloud

Remember Vuforia? Qualcomm’s augmented reality platform allows you to scan real world objects and create “interactive experiences” on your smartphone or tablet. The technology had its limitation though, only scanning photos against a local database of 80 images. Now Qualcomm has announced that by adding the cloud into the mix, so the platform can perform image recognition against over one million images.

Continue Reading

Are $1,500 Google Glasses a bargain?

Are $1,500 Google Glasses a bargain?

Being an early-adopter is seldom cheap, but is Google having a laugh with its $1,500 Project Glass Explorer Edition? Put up for surprise pre-order at Google IO today - though not expected to ship until early next year - the search giant demands a hefty sum for those wanting to augment their reality early. Cutting edge costs, sure, but there's the potential for significantly more affordable options that could be here just as soon as Google Glass is.

Continue Reading