augmented reality

Saga takes on Siri and Google Now in mobile context

Saga takes on Siri and Google Now in mobile context

Siri, Google Now and other digital personal assistants have a new rival in the shape of Saga, a mobile app that uses learns from users to provide contextual help, suggestions and more. A free app, currently iPhone-only, Saga pulls in data from Facebook, Twitter and other apps to build an understanding of the individual user, and then crunches that with schedules and preferences to produce suggestions as to nearby restaurants, when would be a good time in the day to run, where friends are (and who users might actually like to hang out with), and other recommendations. However, Saga's future is most definitely in wearables like Google's Glass.

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Valve’s Gabe Newell talks wearable computing, touch and tongues

Valve’s Gabe Newell talks wearable computing, touch and tongues

When he's not trash-talking Windows 8, Valve's Gabe Newell is pondering next-gen wearable computing interfaces and playing with $70,000 augmented reality headsets, the outspoken exec has revealed. Speaking at the Casual Connect game conference this week, Valve co-founder and ex-Microsoftie Newell presented head-up display lag and issues of input and control for wearables as the next big challenge facing mobile computing, VentureBeat reports.

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Wearable technology developer exclaims massive adoption potential

Wearable technology developer exclaims massive adoption potential

This week we had a brief chat with Will Powell, a developer responsible for some rather fantastic advances in the world of what Google has suddenly made a very visible category of devices: wearable technology. With Google's Project Glass nearer and nearer reality with each passing day, we asked Powell how his own projects were making advances at the same time, and how he saw advances in mobile gadgets as moving forward - and possibly away from smartphones and tablets entirely.

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Qualcomm talks mobile benchmarks, user experience, and AR

Qualcomm talks mobile benchmarks, user experience, and AR

Getting started here with Qualcomm we've jumped right into benchmarks. Something that has increasingly been playing a large role in smartphones as a whole, and consumers purchase decisions. Overall when it comes down to it benchmarks should not only test graphics or CPU, but the overall user experience on mobile computing devices.

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Google Glass inspired project brings real-time translation

Google Glass inspired project brings real-time translation

This week the inventor known as Will Powell has created a project with heads-up display technology in mind - near real time translation, right up to the mind's eye. If there's one thing Google's Project Glass has done for the world - even though it's not a product many of us can own quite yet - it's to inspire developers and technicians around the world. What Powell has done here is to take several components and combine them to create a pair of glasses that shows what a person has said in text right after they've said it - translated into any language you like.

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Ikea augmented reality catalog becomes reality

Ikea augmented reality catalog becomes reality

When you think of retailers that are on the bleeding edge of technology, Ikea isn't usually the one that comes to mind. But then again, it did launch its first ever consumer electronics device earlier this year - an Internet-connected TV that comes with a truly-Ikea style stand to hold it. And now the company is enhancing its mobile technology arm.

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Don’t be blind on wearable cameras insists AR genius

Don’t be blind on wearable cameras insists AR genius

The augmented reality researcher at the center of allegations of assault over sporting a wearable computer in public has warned that ubiquitous cameras - and the potential for privacy incidents - are only going to increase. Professor Steve Mann, the father of wearables who claimed McDonald's staff in Paris assaulted him and damaged his advanced EyeTap headset earlier this month, fired back at criticisms that his constantly-running camera was a provocation to the privacy-minded. "Ironically the people most frightened of cameras seem to be the ones who are pointing cameras at us (e.g. big multinational organizations)" Mann argues.

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