AOL

AOL picks up photo app Hipster

AOL picks up photo app Hipster

AOL has just announced that it has acquired a photo-sharing app called Hipster and its namesake company. Launched last year, Hipster has 100,000 users that create their own digital postcards, containing location data, that can be shared with their friends and family. With the acquisition, the entire team moves to AOL and will also be developing other projects.

Continue Reading

Instant Messenger not dead insists AOL

Instant Messenger not dead insists AOL

Talk of AOL Instant Messenger's death has been greatly exaggerated, the company says, claiming it has no plans to shut down the AIM service. Although reports circulated yesterday suggesting AIM had been axed, the company insists to Computerworld that "we are not killing Instant Messenger" and that instead "we'll continue to support it and evolve the product." That evolution will go on without a chunk of AIM team staff, however, including its chief.

Continue Reading

AOL kills Instant Messenger

AOL kills Instant Messenger

Likely the very first non-email application you ever used to speak with your friends and relatives is about to be shut down for good, AOL Instant Messanger, aka AIM, has been all but slashed entirely from the AOL family. This application's 40 employees in charge of development as well as everything outside of basic maintenance has been let go entirely. While support staff for the ecosystem will remain, no future upgrades to the software will exist from this point on.

Continue Reading

AOL to announce more mass layoffs

AOL to announce more mass layoffs

Poor AOL. Once the only major player in the online market, it's now just a shell of what it used to be, and the company is expected to axe another sweeping group of employees, including executives. Sadly, it's not much of a surprise, as the company is struggling to find a new voice in the 21st century. This time it's targeting those who work on its communications platforms.

Continue Reading

GigaOM acquires paidContent.org’s parent company

GigaOM acquires paidContent.org’s parent company

GigaOM, a San Francisco-based Web 2.0 online news site, has acquired fellow digital media company ContentNext Media, the parent company of the popular site paidContent.org. ContentNext was put up on the market last November after its previous owner, Guardian News & Media, decided to ditch the brand and focus instead on expanding the reach of its other online publication. In other words, it's a whirlwind of corporate hand-offs that was officially announced today.

Continue Reading

AOL’s Huffington Post to enter streaming video territory

AOL’s Huffington Post to enter streaming video territory

The Huffington Post, which has blossomed into one of the biggest online news networks in the world, is planning to enter a space it hasn't really delved into before - live streaming video. The site will essentially become a competitor not only to online news outlets but to the 24/7 cable news networks as well. At least, that is the goal. The site plans to offer 12 hours of original programming every day.

Continue Reading

Microsoft considering Yahoo! bid

Microsoft considering Yahoo! bid

Stockholders today are speaking about several things when it comes to big internet-born companies, the biggest news here being Microsoft's possible future purchase of Yahoo! It seems that as Yahoo!'s former chief exec Carol Bartz exits and their board hires several banks (reportedly) to help them decide what to do with the company, like sell it, Microsoft is apparently speaking internally about picking up the group for a pretty penny. On the other hand, AOL appears to be a less than appealing choice for a purchase than Yahoo! as the source for this story speaks about below.

Continue Reading

Google To Invest Millions On Celebrity Youtube Channels

Google To Invest Millions On Celebrity Youtube Channels

The recent boom of YouTube stars may get pushed aside by established Hollywood stars. Google is looking to entice established celebrities with $5 million dollars for their own YouTube channel of original content. The money would cover salaries, production values, and the celebrity would get full ownership of the show. Google hopes to get twenty celebrity channels, which equals to a $100 million investment. They can afford the price tag by making it back quickly with the premium advertising they plan to run on the channels. The move mirrors what AOL and Yahoo are doing with personal celebrity channels, but YouTube has a much larger footprint and distribution network.

Continue Reading

75% of AOL subscribers “don’t realize” they don’t need it

75% of AOL subscribers “don’t realize” they don’t need it

AOL's dial-up service could be in worse shape than previously believed, with a former executive telling the New Yorker [subscription required] that 75-percent of the people who subscribe "don't need it." According to the unnamed ex-exec, 80-percent of AOL's profits come from subscribers, "many of who are older people who have cable or DSL service" but are unaware that they needn't pay the old AOL dial-up fee in order to access their email.

Continue Reading

1 2 3 4 5 6