ACTA

ACTA regulations may still live hints EC chief

ACTA regulations may still live hints EC chief

The controversial Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) may have been thoroughly spanked in a European Parliament vote today, but there are ominous indications that its proponents may not be willing to give up so readily. Comments made by European Commissioner and ACTA backer Karel De Gucht ahead of the vote suggest that the agreement could well return despite the strongly expressed opinions of the parliamentary members, using decisions on fundamental copyright rights passed by Europe's highest court.

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European Parliament rejects ACTA in 478 to 39 vote

European Parliament rejects ACTA in 478 to 39 vote

ACTA, the controversial anti-counterfeiting trade agreement, has been rejected by the European Parliament by a staggering majority. The law was smacked down by a 478 to 39 vote, and has now been completely killed in Europe. Internet activists rallied against ACTA when it was seen to be a legislative act that was far too broad, with criminal sanctions also found in the trade agreement.

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Piracy Agreement ACTA faces EU’s highest court

Piracy Agreement ACTA faces EU’s highest court

This week the act known as the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) has been pushed before the European Union's highest court where it will face scrutiny by law. This move has been described by EU trade head Karel De Gucht as a question by the court that will clarify whether the treaty was able to comply with "the EU's fundamental rights and freedoms." What we know so far of the ACTA, for those of you following along, is that its a multi-nation agreement currently being signed (or protested against) after its initial negotiation excluded civil society groups, developing countries, and the general public on the whole.

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ACTA signee Slovenia ambassador now calls for mass protest

ACTA signee Slovenia ambassador now calls for mass protest

One of the most recent leaders to sign the secretive and wide-spread internet censorship-minded Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement has now apologized and called for mass demonstrations to protest what she's done. It's Slovenia's ambassador to Japan, miss Helena Drnovsek Zorko, who signed the ACTA and was immediately drown in emails and calls from Slovenians criticizing her for doing so. This bill was then read in full by the ambassador, she then deciding that the agrees fully with the critics who've mailed her, apologizing to her children and her country before calling for what's effectively a revolt against the agreement on the whole.

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