nsa

AT&T and NSA were BFFs shocking Snowden files claim

AT&T and NSA were BFFs shocking Snowden files claim

AT&T and the NSA have worked hand in hand to install a vast internet monitoring system, with the telecoms firm aiding spies in wiretapping the United Nations. Although it's been well known for some time that all of the telecommunications firms are obliged to work with the National Security Agency (NSA) on internet monitoring, courtesy of a number of legal requirements, the scale to which AT&T was in bed with the government has not been realized until now.

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NSA will delete phone records on 29th November, sort of

NSA will delete phone records on 29th November, sort of

Can an elephant forget? That might be the metaphorical question on people's minds after hearing about the NSA's move to restrict its access to phone records accumulated under the USA Patriot Act. On face value, it seems like a win for privacy and all that, but, as with all legal cases, there are always fineprints to be meticulously observed. In other words, the phone database won't exactly disappear immediately, but will hang around for a while, giving interested people some time to do what they can to squeeze out what they can.

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NSA can restart bulk data collection for 6 months, rules court

NSA can restart bulk data collection for 6 months, rules court

The American Civil Liberties Union is gearing up for a legal battle following a ruling yesterday evening by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court — according to it, the National Security Agency (NSA) can restart its bulk collection of American phone data. The ACLU is planning to challenge the ruling, and will be seeking an injunction against the program via the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. Previously this court had ruled that the NSA’s bulk collection program was illegal.

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NSA, GCHQ attacked popular anti-virus software, says leak

NSA, GCHQ attacked popular anti-virus software, says leak

Here's another one for the spy books. To the surprise of perhaps no one, the NSA, along with their British counterparts, the GCHQ, have been revealed to have targeted, hacked, and compromised the very companies whose jobs it was to protect users from hacking and attacks, like, say, from criminals. This is the latest round of scandals coming from the ever-flowing Snowden leaks. Perhaps most worrying is the fact that this so called Project CAMBERDADA targeted not government or corporate security software, but the ones that most of us use on our PCs.

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Amazon’s first transparency report plays coy with details

Amazon’s first transparency report plays coy with details

Amazon has opened up on customer privacy, issuing its first ever transparency report and denying ever having participated in the notorious NSA PRISM program. While the online shopping behemoth may be best known by most consumers for its retail division, the other side to Jeff Bezos' empire is a huge cloud business, offering server and hosting services to startups and established names in enterprise alike. It's the reputation of that which Amazon is hoping to gild now.

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NSA expanded warrantless internet surveillance in attempt to stop hackers

NSA expanded warrantless internet surveillance in attempt to stop hackers

New documents from Edward Snowden have revealed that since 2012, the US's National Security Agency has had an expanded ability to spy on Americans' internet data and communications, with no need to get a warrant. The documents were published in a New York Times article this week, and reveal that the NSA's goal is to find and stop hackers attempting cyberattacks from outside the country. Until now, this program was never disclosed to the public.

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NSA eyed hijacking connections to Samsung, Google app stores

NSA eyed hijacking connections to Samsung, Google app stores

You have to hand it to the NSA and its allies. It would have moved heaven and earth to be able to spy on anyone and everyone. In the interests of national security, of course. The latest covert plans revealed by whistleblower Edward Snowden strikes at the very heart of the Android world. According to leaked documents, the NSA and its counterparts in the "Five Eyes" alliance sought to ride on the traffic that connects smartphones with the likes of Google Play Store, in order to implant spyware on these devices.

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House passes USA Freedom Act, curtails NSA’s powers

House passes USA Freedom Act, curtails NSA’s powers

The NSA and other government agencies like it have been dealt yet with another near fatal blow. Just a week after the Court of Appeals agreed with the ACLU that the agency's massive data collection spree was illegal, the House of Representative further reduces the NSA's power. In an almost landslide vote of 338 to 88, the House passed what is known now as the USA Freedom Act of 2015, which imposes limits on what the government can and cannot demand in terms of private phone data.

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Appeals court rules NSA surveillance program illegal

Appeals court rules NSA surveillance program illegal

In March, the ACLU filed a lawsuit against the NSA, claiming their surveillance program was overreaching and illegal. Today, a Federal Court of Appeals has agreed with that assertion, finding the NSA’s practice of data collection “exceeds the scope of what Congress has authorized”. This decision comes well after Edward Snowden began leaking documentation highlighting just how deep and intrusive the NSA’s domestic surveillance program is. In the ruling, Circuit Judge Gerald Lynch wrote “such an expansive concept of 'relevance' is unprecedented and unwarranted”.

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Forget spying, now the NSA wants your password list

Forget spying, now the NSA wants your password list

The NSA isn't interested in a sneaky back door into your smartphone or computer any more, it just wants you to leave the front door wide open. While arguments continue around just what the National Security Agency can and can't get access to - dragging more than one big tech name into the controversy - the spy organization's chief is suggesting a far more blunt approach: in effect, handing over the keys to encryption upfront.

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People care about privacy when John Oliver sells it to them

People care about privacy when John Oliver sells it to them

Last Week Tonight with John Oliver just did a bang-up job showing off the newest in government surveillance law in the United States. Such a bang-up job, in fact, that the YouTube release of the 33-minute segment has garnered nearly 3-million views in less than two days. As Oliver explains, no one cared about the government surveillance program known as the Patriot Act for the first decade it was active, authorized, and re-authorized after it was enacted following September 11, 2001. Fast forward to June of 2013 and Edward Snowden infamously revealed the goings-on of the NSA - fast forward to 2015 and John Oliver is interviewing Edward Snowden.

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NSA sued over surveillance by Wikimedia & more

NSA sued over surveillance by Wikimedia & more

The NSA may be used to lurking in the shadows and quietly reading our emails, but the ACLU and Wikimedia Foundation aren't willing to let them stay that way, filing a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of the government agency's actions. The suit, filed today in the US District Court for the District of Maryland, takes issue with NSA "upstream" surveillance which, it's argued, needlessly and intrusively gathers huge quantities of text-based messages sent and received by innocent people. That, the ACLU insists, is an infringement of both First and Fourth Amendment rights, among other things.

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