Microsoft

Is Microsoft’s How Old website storing your photos? Maybe

Is Microsoft’s How Old website storing your photos? Maybe

By now nearly every netizen has heard of How Old Do I Look, Microsoft's facial recognition website that has gone viral over the last few days. Many users have gotten laughs, or been disappointed, over just how inaccurate the guesses are sometimes. But what isn't being talked about is what's actually happening to the photos that users upload. While the website has the message "We don't keep the photo" placed front and center, the language used in the terms of service have hints of a different meaning.

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Microsoft kills Media Center for Windows 10

Microsoft kills Media Center for Windows 10

If you're a Windows user and Windows Media Center is your media player of choice, there's bad news coming with the future release of the Windows 10 operating system. Microsoft has confirmed that the software will not be included with, and is in fact incompatible with, Windows 10. While Media Center has been a part of the operating system up until the latest version of 8.1, active development on the software actually ended back in 2009. Speaking to ZDNet during the Build developer conference last week, Microsoft stated that any PCs updating from Windows 7 or 8.1 will lose all Media Center functionality.

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Understanding HoloLens in 5 steps

Understanding HoloLens in 5 steps

Microsoft's most impressive and strange project right this minute is the augmented reality headset "HoloLens." This headset was first introduced back in January at the big Windows 10 event. We've had the opportunity this week to go hands-on and eyes-on with the newest iteration of this once-tethered headset at BUILD 2015, Microsoft's developer conference, and have produced one massive hands-on feature. For those of you wish a slightly shorter attention span, there's the article you're reading right now. This is Understanding HoloLens in 5 steps.

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Microsoft has acquired N-Trig, brings Surface stylus tech in-house

Microsoft has acquired N-Trig, brings Surface stylus tech in-house

Microsoft has announced their acquisition of long-time partner N-Trig, who they’ve leaned on for technology in their Surface 3 and Surface Pro 3 styli. We first heard Microsoft had acquired the Israeli company in February, but nothing official materialized on the acquisition front. Now we have it straight from Microsoft, though that’s really all we do know. There’s been no word of a purchase price or terms, but Microsoft already owned 6% of N-Trig through a 2009 investment.

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Video: ‘Project Astoria’, Microsoft’s Android app porting tool, at work

Video: ‘Project Astoria’, Microsoft’s Android app porting tool, at work

Microsoft’s Project Astoria, their system for taking existing Android app code and running it inside windows, is both exciting and troubling. On one hand, it satisfies the ‘write once deploy everywhere’ strategy that makes a Developer’s life easier. On the other hand, these apps aren’t really native for the platform, which has us wondering about things like performance. Also, how easy is it for Developers to move an app over? Now we know; Microsoft has created a simple video outlining Project Astoria’s strengths, and I have to say — I’m intrigued.

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HoloLens hands-on: Building for Windows Holographic

HoloLens hands-on: Building for Windows Holographic

Back in January, HoloLens was a Frankenstein’s monster of a headset. In fact, the eyepiece itself was only part of the test rig: the rest was conspicuously tethered to it with a physical cable hooked up to a Windows 10 PC. To say there’s been a dramatic shift in hardware in the ninety days or so since then is an understatement. Microsoft brought a fleet of HoloLens prototypes to BUILD 2015, each of them a standalone computer, eyepiece, sensor rig, and spatial sound system all integrated into a single headset, and offered me the opportunity to see what creating a Windows Holographic experience was like.

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Windows 8: what Microsoft did right and what went wrong

Windows 8: what Microsoft did right and what went wrong

Windows 10 is coming really soon. If AMD is to be believed, that is happening around July. Given this upcoming version of Windows is set to fix a number of complaints about Windows 8, it's release will surely call to mind some its predecessor's shortcomings. But for all the warts that Windows 8 had, it wasn't completely a failure in all aspects and even laid the foundations of many features and mindsets still present in Windows 10 and elsewhere. Here we take a look at 5 of the things Windows 8 could have gotten right and also how they failed to reach the mark.

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No Windows 10 smartphones this summer

No Windows 10 smartphones this summer

It's no secret that Microsoft plans to launch Windows 10 on computers this summer. If you were hoping that meant that the operating system would be landing on smartphones this summer as well, we have some bad news. Microsoft's Joe Belfiore has said recently that the smartphone builds for Windows 10 aren’t as far along as the builds for the PC.

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Microsoft’s iOS, Android app porting tools now open

Microsoft’s iOS, Android app porting tools now open

Developers can now start porting their Android and iOS apps to Windows, if they dare. Yesterday, Microsoft announced a suspiciously easy tool that allows Developers to port their iOS and Android apps to the Windows platform. On stage, Microsoft demoed an Android app running on a Windows Phone like it was made for the platform. Now, Project Islandwood (iOS) and Project Astoria (Android) are open for business. They are, of course, in a “limited preview”, so don’t expect too much just yet.

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Microsoft’s ‘How Old’ age estimator reaps Internet mockery

Microsoft’s ‘How Old’ age estimator reaps Internet mockery

Microsoft has a facial recognition tool called 'How Old' that aims to guess your age based on a picture of your face. It's a fun little novelty...or it would be if it were accurate. Rather, many users find the guesses to be inaccurate, sometimes very much so, and as a result the Internet has done what the Internet often does: taken to mockery. A bunch of screenshots have appeared on Twitter (and elsewhere) showing faces and the ages estimated, and in some cases faces that aren't even human.

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