Internet

Google researchers discover SSL 3.0 bug

Google researchers discover SSL 3.0 bug

We've heard about a lot of bugs this year, not the least of which being the recent "Shellshock" bug. Now Google researchers have discovered a bug in SSL 3.0 that could allow hackers to nab user data. The discovery was detailed today in a report published by the team, which says they were able to breach the protocol using what they call a "POODLE" attack -- Padding Oracle On Downgraded Legacy Encryption attack. With this, they have recommended that SSL 3.0 be disabled to mitigate the problem.

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anonabox: Tor in a box for maximum anonymity and freedom

anonabox: Tor in a box for maximum anonymity and freedom

Some lawmakers and parties have likened the Internet to the Wild Wild West in order to justify putting a clamp on it. For many users, however, that freedom is part and parcel of the Internet's nature and is necessary for it to survive. To help stem off attempts to curtail the freedom of speech on the Internet, not to mention growing number of spying on users, a group of friends have designed anonabox, a discrete and easy to use networking device that could give the NSA nightmares.

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President Obama voices opposition to Internet ‘fast lanes’ proposal

President Obama voices opposition to Internet ‘fast lanes’ proposal

Having campaigned in support of net neutrality during the 2008 election, President Barack Obama last week spoke out in opposition to recent FCC proposals that threaten to bring about "paid prioritization." Obama said he was against the creation of internet "fast lanes," which would allow ISP to charge users a higher price for faster speeds when it comes to content and data.

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Panel says NSA surveillance is a threat to the Internet’s survival

Panel says NSA surveillance is a threat to the Internet’s survival

Imagine a future where a single unified Internet no longer exists, instead being replaced by locked down local versions that exist, primarily, to keep prying eyes away from data that is private. Such is one possibility posed by current government Internet surveillance, largely resting on the NSA's shoulders, according to a panel that recently gathered to discuss the issue. Senator Ron Wyden set up the discussion panel, and many big-name individuals from within the tech industry took part, including Google's Eric Schmidt and Microsoft's General Counsel Brad Smith. The topic is a serious one, and dire warnings were given.

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Imgur has made a new GIF format for the modern age

Imgur has made a new GIF format for the modern age

Animated GIFs and the Internet go together like peanut butter and jelly. Whether your Internet browsing habits take you to Reddit, Tumblr, or elsewhere, you likely run into multiple GIFs per day, each expressing a thought or emotion or showing off the best part of a video in wonderful looping fashion. The Internet of today is far different than the Internet that existed when the first GIF was born, of course, and it was only a matter of time before the format we all know and love changed to suit modern needs. Thus was born the GIFV ("jiffy") format.

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The Egg wants to be your personal portable web server

The Egg wants to be your personal portable web server

The folks behind the company Eggcyte are concerned about your privacy, and want to help you maintain it using a different method than most: with a portable personal web server called The Egg. Dubbed such due to its egg-like design, The Egg gives users their own Egg website where they can provide content for others to see and enjoy, sans having to upload to a social network or cloud service. Eggcyte says all of one's personal content and site details are contained with the Egg.

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Warner Bros. anti-piracy methods revealed in court docs

Warner Bros. anti-piracy methods revealed in court docs

The battle over movie piracy just became a bit more transparent, with unsealed court documents revealing how Warner Bros. goes about finding infringing content and issuing takedown notices. The information was revealed as part of a lawsuit by file-hosting service Hotfile, which was a counter-suit issued during a legal debacle with the MPAA, something that ultimately resulted in a large settlement. The counter-suit resulted in redacted court filings hiding how Warner Bros. goes about finding pirated content, which attracted the attention of the Electronic Frontier Foundation. Upon request by the EFF, the case judge ruled that the records be unsealed.

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Comcast reportedly called subscriber’s employer to complain about complaint

Comcast reportedly called subscriber’s employer to complain about complaint

Comcast isn't viewed favorably by many consumers, and received a lot of criticism this past summer when a recording was published revealing the difficulty a subscriber had when trying to cancel his service. The latest complaint is worse, as surprising as that may be, and it ends on a sad note: Comcast reportedly contacted the subscriber's employer and lied about conversations that took place, leading to the subscriber being fired from his job, and now refuses to release any copies of the conversations to prove they did, indeed, happen.

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Bing’s newest feature brings lyrics to search page

Bing’s newest feature brings lyrics to search page

Microsoft has rolled out updates to its Bing search engine on a fairly regular basis over the year, adding features like improved image search. As promised, it has introduced yet another improvement to the engine, this time catering to those who prefer belting out songs on karaoke night: lyrics. Calling it "a new Lyrics experience," Microsoft says the feature saves you time by bringing the lyrics you're looking for front and center on the search results page -- something that third-party lyrics websites might not be too fond of.

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