Internet

Holy cow 2.1 million people still use AOL dial-up for internet

Holy cow 2.1 million people still use AOL dial-up for internet

This week AOL reported their Q1 2015 earnings, and with it, notified the planet of 2.1 million subscribers to their internet service with dial-up speeds. Welcome back to the age of installing the internet on your computer with a CD you got in the mail. This is a reminder that hardship exists. This is a reminder that, while there are people who are homeless on the streets of Brooklyn but still have a smartphone that can access the internet at 3G speeds, there are people living in the country connecting at 56 kilobits-per-second.

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FCC marches on with open internet rules, AT&T stay denied

FCC marches on with open internet rules, AT&T stay denied

AT&T and fellow telecom companies are trying to prevent the FCC from rolling out new Net Neutrality rules. The telecom companies' latest strategy to slow down the new regulation process from taking effect was to request a stay, which would delay the reclassification of internet as a public utility. The court officially denied the stay in its latest ruling. The telecom companies claimed that because they didn't seek a say request against the three "bright-line" internet rules from the FCC's new Internet regulation, (no throttling, no paid prioritization, and no obstruction of legal content) their stay would not harm the public interest. Yet, the court failed to agree.

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Mysterious team resurrects Grooveshark

Mysterious team resurrects Grooveshark

If all the streaming options and other ways to legally get music online aren't to your tastes, there's a decent chance Grooveshark's demise was a disappointing blow to your music acquisition habits. Less than week later, however, the service is back and it's thanks to a mysterious group that has surfaced to talk about their exploits. As it turns out, when the writing was on the wall some folks behind the scenes at Grooveshark started making backup plans in case things went south.

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Facebook gets serious about open internet for all

Facebook gets serious about open internet for all

Those of you in the world wide web and abroad aiming to bring the internet to the whole world can now team up with Facebook if you do so wish. Internet.org, the Facebook-made internets services portal, is now a platform for developer to help in the aim to spread internet access across the entire planet. Three guidelines for participation have been outlined for developers. With these three guidelines in mind, the internet can spread far and wide with developers and apps of all kinds.

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Facebook announces Internet.org Platform

Facebook announces Internet.org Platform

Facebook has announced the launch of a new project called Internet.org that aims to connect mobile users in the developing world by allowing developers to create apps and services on top of the internet.org Platform. Facebook previously offered the platform only to a few partners and has now opened it up to any developer that wants to try the platform out.

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Facebook looking to host news stories with Instant Articles

Facebook looking to host news stories with Instant Articles

Facebook, the company, doesn't like it when you leave Facebook, the social network, to view other content on the internet. Which is exactly what you do when you click a link to a news article that someone has shared in a post. Facebook would much rather you stay on their site for as long as possible. A new report from The Wall Street Journal details an upcoming attempt by Facebook to keep you put called Instant Articles. The feature would allow users to read full articles in their feed from sources like Buzzfeed, New York Times, and National Geographic.

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Is Microsoft’s How Old website storing your photos? Maybe

Is Microsoft’s How Old website storing your photos? Maybe

By now nearly every netizen has heard of How Old Do I Look, Microsoft's facial recognition website that has gone viral over the last few days. Many users have gotten laughs, or been disappointed, over just how inaccurate the guesses are sometimes. But what isn't being talked about is what's actually happening to the photos that users upload. While the website has the message "We don't keep the photo" placed front and center, the language used in the terms of service have hints of a different meaning.

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Comcast said to be developing YouTube-like video service

Comcast said to be developing YouTube-like video service

Comcast, the cable and internet service provider/monopoly, may be looking to expand into a new area: the short-form, web-generated video content that YouTube excels at. A new report from The Information says Comcast has been working on an online video service for over a year and a half now, and is planning a nationwide rollout for sometime in the future. The project was put on hold as the now-cancelled Comcast/Time Warner merger was submitted for government review.

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Google’s Password Alert already patched but still vulnerable

Google’s Password Alert already patched but still vulnerable

Earlier this week, Google released a Chrome extension designed to protect against phishing attacks, particularly the kind that directs users to a page designed to look like one of Google's own login pages. When on one of these fake Google logins, the Password Alert extension was designed to identify that it was a phishing attempt and alert the user that they were about to enter their credentials on a Web page that isn't part of Google. The problem is that the extension itself was vulnerable, and remains that way despite a patch.

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