Should developers care about app revenue?

Jul 26, 2014
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Should developers care about app revenue?

Why do you think a developer should create an app? Earlier this week I made a rather hardline stance on the current state of the app development universe for smart devices, suggesting that because Android-based revenue from app-buyers was lower than iOS, that developers should abandon Google’s mobile operating system. Now I’m not quite so sure.

When you see charts like I shared in in this post, things look bleak for Android: "If I were a developer, I’d abandon Android now." That post contains some very simplistic views.

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ABOVE: This chart from the article linked above shows how app average revenue per user with Android is 1/4 that of iOS.

Then you scroll down to the comments from our very intelligent and outspoken readers and you find a whole new world of perspective.

According to developer Aaron Hurt: "my company wants to extend our products and services to our customers in the most ways possible. By doing this, it necessitates Android development. In fact, Android use is 56% of the mobile market for us. 40% is iOS and the remaining is Windows Mobile or other."

"Show me a developer who makes money on iOS and not Android and I will show you flaws in their strategy," NerdShowAndTell suggests the gap between iOS and Android has to do in part with developers starting in iOS and doing simple ports. "Any developer ignoring Android these days is not getting the right market research. Android users WANT good apps, but they can see right through iOS ports and half-ass attempts."

Our own Ewdison Then suggested that statistics have very little baring on how well your app will do in the market. "As an app developer myself, I can't really agree, it goes back to how well your apps is being made and if it serve the users well," said Then. "If you develop a coveted app, you will make more money regardless which one of the two popular platform, obviously can't work well when the user pool is small."

The data I worked with on the 22nd was also not nearly comprehensive enough to provide a conclusion as harsh as I did. One should never - ever - follow the lead of someone who tells you to abandon something you’ve worked hard on based only on two data points.

Question everything and everyone - especially if what you’re reading or hearing has to do with your livelihood.


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