Shots of Me launches to Bieber fans and doubters alike

Nov 12, 2013
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Shots of Me launches to Bieber fans and doubters alike

Shots of Me, the Justin Bieber-backed selfie app for iOS, launched today. Despite Bieber doubters' derision, the app could actually serve a variety of useful and fun purposes--and not just in terms of marketability to high schoolers. The app's intentional lack of commenting functions, the frosty-screened button bars, the emphasis on human interest rather than inanimate objects, and other features could potentially make for an engaging social photo experience.

The app, if you haven't yet heard, takes pictures of you via your front-facing camera and posts them to the Shots of Me social network as well as to Twitter. In turn, you get to see a never-ending stream of your friends' selfies. Not convinced that's a fun time? Think about all the boring food shots you see on Instagram. How about now--think you'll give Shots of Me a try? No?

How about this. Shots of Me has no commenting on photos. This avoids public drama and bullying (which is why the Biebs funded the app to the tune of $1 million--he wants people to feel safe online.) Instead if you want to talk to someone through the app, you can send a direct message--or block direct messages accordingly (private drama totally optional.)

The app design itself is pretty slick, along the lines of the design quality Instagram is known for. The button bars on the top and bottom of the app take on a frosted glass effect that mimics the main color palette of the selfie being viewed. Looks nice, right? (See hero image above.)

Whether or not you decide to give "the Bieber app" a try, one thing is sure: The company behind it, RockLive, is very well funded, and it wants a place beside Instagram. It might even get it. Those of you who are too good for Shots of Me can take heart: Maybe all those selfies you claim to hate seeing will all be herded into a single place, leaving you free and clear to post yet another foodie of your Big Mac and box wine.

SOURCE: TechCrunch


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