Features

Google smartwatch tipped by June with Google Now focus

Google smartwatch tipped by June with Google Now focus

Google is targeting a March release for its own smartwatch, a Bluetooth LE wearable designed to work alongside an Android smartphone, though insiders on the project are reportedly pessimistic that the current timescale is realistic. Google has already pared back on the complexity of the design it's said, switching from a metal strap to a plastic one, but even so there's a strong possibility that the ship date could slip to June 2014 or see Google launch the gadget with even fewer features than initially intended.

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Samsung Gear 2 and Gear 2 Neo smartwatches official

Samsung Gear 2 and Gear 2 Neo smartwatches official

Samsung has revealed two new smartwatches, the Gear 2 and Gear 2 Neo, refining its original Galaxy Gear wearable and ditching Android for Tizen in the process. Revealed at MWC 2014, the Gear 2 and Gear 2 Neo each have a 1.63-inch 320 x 320 Super AMOLED display and run Samsung-led Tizen on a 1GHz dualcore processor. Differentiating the two is that the Neo lacks a camera, a 2-megapixel shooter which the Gear 2 integrates into its main body, not the strap as before.

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MWC 2014: The Phones, Tablets & Wearables to Expect

MWC 2014: The Phones, Tablets & Wearables to Expect

Mobile World Congress is upon us again, the cellularly-centric Barcelona show expected to see Nokia reveal its first Android device, Samsung its latest Galaxy flagship ahead of the iPhone 6 later this year, and wearables manufacturers further pitch the fast-growing segment. SlashGear is headed off to Spain to bring back all the details as they're announced, but we've already got a good idea of what we can expect and just how much of an impact it might make. Read on for our full pre-show guide!

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Has Casual Gaming Killed the AAA Blockbuster Console Game?

Has Casual Gaming Killed the AAA Blockbuster Console Game?

The sheer amount of excitement surrounding Titanfall is enough to annoy any old-school, crotchety gamer like me who has watched the mighty fall and the seemingly insignificant rise. Titanfall supporters would have us believe that it's the next big franchise that will change the way we game for the next decade. And without a doubt, it'll perform well on store shelves at first. But whether the game will have the longevity to be a top-end title and franchise for the foreseeable future remains in doubt.

I don't say all of this because I don't think Titanfall could be a great game or that I have something against blockbuster titles. I've just come to realize over the last couple of years that the days of AAA blockbuster console games truly revolutionizing the way we play games might be dead.

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Nokia Lumia Icon Review

Nokia Lumia Icon Review

Verizon has needed a new Windows Phone 8 flagship, and Nokia was the obvious choice to deliver it. Don't mistake the Lumia Icon for a side-thought in Nokia's smartphone schemes, however. On paper, at least, it takes the key things we loved from AT&T's Lumia 1520, and distills them down to a more hand-friendly scale. Does reality live up to those high expectations? Read on for the SlashGear review.

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Kopin Pupil hands-on: Glass tech without geek looks

Kopin Pupil hands-on: Glass tech without geek looks

Kopin has revealed its latest wearable system, Pupil, a combination of a micro-display and voice control noise-cancellation system the company hopes will eventually be used in head-worn tech like Google's Glass. A reference design intending to show how wearable computing could be integrated into a design that's more palatable to the consumer market, Pupil isn't intended for the market in its current form, but is instead intended to showcase the fruits of Kopin's new partnership with Olympus in display technology. We caught up with Kopin to find out more.

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FCC isn’t giving up on Net Neutrality

FCC isn’t giving up on Net Neutrality

The FCC has outlined its reworked plan to achieve net neutrality, following its defeat in the federal courts last month, including the possibility of reclassifying ISPs altogether so as to force through rules. The Federal Communications Commission was told it did not have the authority to stop broadband providers like Verizon and Comcast from prioritizing select internet traffic or, conversely, slowing other traffic, but the court pointed out that it may already have the power in other ways under existing telecoms laws. Now, FCC Commissioner Tom Wheeler says he will "accept that invitation" from the court.

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