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Nokia Lumia 1320 Review

Nokia Lumia 1320 Review

Nokia's Lumia 1520 grabbed the bulk of the headlines at the company's Abu Dhabi event last October, but it wasn't the only phablet the company brought along. In addition to the 6-inch flagship there was another, more affordable phone, the Nokia Lumia 1320, trading some of the high-end specs in favor of mass-market appeal. Question is, with a lower resolution display and the sacrifice of PureView, has Nokia trimmed too much to make the Lumia 1320 a hit? Read on for the full review.

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Redux Dark Matters heads to Dreamcast: here’s why retro is “in”

Redux Dark Matters heads to Dreamcast: here’s why retro is “in”

After months of development and a rather successful crowd-funded venture last year, the folks behind the game Redux: Dark Matters are ready to bring their game to the public. This game is, believe it or not, set to be released for the Sega Dreamcast, a gaming console that was last sold in the year 2001. While the console itself is largely hailed as one of the biggest flops in video game history, Hucast Games has found a pocket of gamers that still want to use their precious machine for new games - hence the one we're seeing here in 2014!

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The secret to Nest’s future success: Be as un-Google as possible

The secret to Nest’s future success: Be as un-Google as possible

When Google announced last week that it had agreed to acquire Nest for more than $3 billion, there appeared to be a general consensus in the tech world: bad news.

While it's true that Google has acquired companies in the past, like Motorola, that it has largely left alone, its track record of ensuring a company is actually kept intact with the same culture that made it popular and successful isn't necessarily so great. And there's some concern – despite Google's own best assurances to the contrary – that the search giant might again hurt Nest.

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SlashGear 101: Google Smart Contact Lens

SlashGear 101: Google Smart Contact Lens

There's no doubt now that the wearables trend is in full swing, with devices like Motorola's digital tattoos and Google's announcement this week: smart contact lenses. These lenses work with a "miniaturized" glucose sensor that's so very tiny it's able to fit between two layers of contact lens material and fit around your eye, just as a normal lens would. The glucose sensor is there to test the eye's tear-duct liquid to help users with diabetes accurately and simply track their sugar levels.

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Obama NSA reform plan revealed

Obama NSA reform plan revealed

President Obama has defended the NSA's spying actions, arguing that the continuing pace of technological advancement means surveillance is essential, though revealing a "series of concrete and substantial reforms" he believes will address public concerns. The proposals, already being picked apart by privacy advocates, include changing the controversial section 215 metadata program, and what Obama described as the "unprecedented" extending of rights around monitoring to non-US citizens outside of America.

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Falcon Northwest defends “fully loaded” Steam Machine

Falcon Northwest defends “fully loaded” Steam Machine

One of the most high-end-friendly builds to be shown in Valve’s first wave of Steam Machines revealed at CES 2014 was the Falcon Northwest Tiki, a tower with a price range topping out at $6,000 USD. According to Falcon Northwest President Kelt Reeves, the range they’ve offered thus far is just an early estimate, one that pre-supposes SteamOS users will have wants and needs all over the spectrum, not just at one single price-point with a single configuration. It would seem that not every Steam Machine manufacturer is attempting to make a gaming console.

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Smart Home players welcome Google (& warn it won’t be as easy as Android)

Smart Home players welcome Google (& warn it won’t be as easy as Android)

Google's surprise acquisition of Nest was met with no small amount of horror from existing users of the company's thermostats, but other players in the smart home segment aren't so worried about a big new name in the industry. Speaking to SlashGear, several of the better-known brands in home automation actively welcomed Google's involvement, countering user concerns around "Big Data" aggregation with the potential for far faster evolution of what's currently a fragmented market. In fact, as more than one company pointed out, it could've been so much worse: Apple could've bought Nest.

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Jawbone ERA Review (2014)

Jawbone ERA Review (2014)

Time was, in Bluetooth headsets, you generally had to choose between style and performance. Some looked great but suffered poor battery life and mediocre audio quality; at the other extreme, you could have lengthy runtimes and excellent audio, but only if you didn't mind looking like you'd just walked out of a call center. Jawbone wants to change all that with the 2014 ERA, a slimmed-down, spec'd-up update of its flagship Bluetooth headset, but can it really bridge both successfully? Read on for the SlashGear review.

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Moto G Google Play Edition hands-on vs Motorola’s G

Moto G Google Play Edition hands-on vs Motorola’s G

When we heard about the Moto G being offered as a Google Play Edition handset, we immediately scratched our heads in wonder. Why would Google offer a device from their own store with the exact same price as the original device when the software is essentially the same? The answer lies in Google's unique plan, the one where they hand-pick the most appealing devices in the market and sell them themselves - all other matters pale when shown in the face of this Google Play Edition long-term goal.

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Net Neutrality is a mess: We can’t even decide what the Internet is

Net Neutrality is a mess: We can’t even decide what the Internet is

The internet as we know it is in peril. Verizon's victory in the court of appeal this week, seeing the FCC's attempts to regulate broadband providers in the name of Net Neutrality defeated, has the potential to change how we access the internet and web services like Netflix, Hulu, and others more fundamentally than 2013's SOPA threatened to. In question isn't whether internet access should be a free-for-all, but what it is fundamentally, legally classified as, and who therefore has control over what gets shuttled through: Verizon and the broadband providers, in control of the "pipes", or the FCC as protector of infrastructure that uses public rights of way. For all both sides are claiming some degree of victory this week, we're still no closer to settling that fundamental question.

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