Results for "wearable computer"

Google’s Glass frames are pretty but dumb

Google’s Glass frames are pretty but dumb

Google has finally revealed its frame options for Glass, the Titanium Collection, with four styles and the chance to have prescription lenses fitted. It addresses a long-standing complain about the wearable computer, and something Google knew it had to fix before the consumer launch before the end of 2014. Problem is, as a Glass Explorer and someone who wears prescription glasses to correct my vision, it feels like Google hasn't thought through exactly how the frames will work in everyday use.

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Google Glass prescription frames official in four styles

Google Glass prescription frames official in four styles

Google has revealed its prescription frames for Google Glass, the much-anticipated accessory which will make the wearable computer more user-friendly to those who already wear glasses. Dubbed the Titanium Collection and offered in four styles - Thin, Classic, Bold, and Split - all are made from lightweight titanium, like the original Glass band, and will be supplied with non-prescription lenses suited for those who don't need their vision corrected, but can be optionally fitted out to suit a prescription.

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Lumus DK-40 hands-on: Glass put on notice

Lumus DK-40 hands-on: Glass put on notice

Lumus has brought its DK-40 wearable to CES 2014, showing off the new developer unit in public for the first time. The monocular headset is, like Google's Glass, an Android-powered wearable computer, but whereas Glass floats a small window for notifications and such in the upper corner of your eye, the DK-40 actually overlays a full VGA digital image over the right eye instead. We grabbed some hands-on time to see whether it lived up to our expectations from the original prototype we tried all the way back in early 2012.

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Google Glass prescription frame option priced up for Explorers

Google Glass prescription frame option priced up for Explorers

Prescription lenses for Google Glass will be priced from $99, one start-up has confirmed, with Rochester Optical revealing early cost details ahead of preorders opening after CES 2014 next week. The company, which confirmed its prescription option for those wanting to use Google's wearable as their regular spectacles was due "in just a few weeks" courtesy of a questionnaire last week, will offer a number of packages that clip onto Glass rather than requiring it be dismantled and attached to a new headpiece, as Google's own system looks to involve.

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Glass invites offered to Google Play Music All Access subscribers

Glass invites offered to Google Play Music All Access subscribers

Google has broadened its Glass invitations to a new group, paid subscribers to Google Play Music All Access, though they'll still have to stump up the not-inconsiderable $1,500-plus-tax sticker price on the beta wearable. The invitations, which are being emailed to All Access subscribers, bills the deal as being to mark the addition of Play Music streaming support to Glass earlier this month.

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What are developers doing to bring us all back together in meatspace?

What are developers doing to bring us all back together in meatspace?

This past Monday, Apple released a commercial depicting what initially appears to be a disaffected teenager ignoring his whole family on a holiday get-together as he stares and thumb-pecks at his iPhone the whole time. In the end, it turned out he was actually shooting footage of his family as a Christmas gift. He edits the footage into a home movie, screencasts it to the living room TV via AirPlay, and the whole family has a Tiny Tim moment as they watch themselves interacting onscreen. Even Grandma is crying tears of joy.

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Lumus DK-40 takes on Glass with true AR

Lumus DK-40 takes on Glass with true AR

Transparent display specialist and military head-up screen supplier Lumus is wading into the wearable computing market, revealing a new developer kit that, unlike Google's Glass, offers full augmented reality support. Set to debut at CES 2014 next month, the Lumus DK-40 monocular dev kit may look ostensibly like Glass at first glance, but where Google's headset has a small display-block suspended in the corner, the entire right lens of the Lumus wearable is in fact a 640 x 480 display. That means developers building apps for the Android-powered headset can overlay graphics directly on top of the real-world view, rather than simply sliding in separate notifications as Glass does.

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Google Calico details emerge: Immortality, Obamacare, and millions of dollars

Google Calico details emerge: Immortality, Obamacare, and millions of dollars

Google didn't spill much on Calico, the Google Ventures founded biotech company that made headlines last month by taking on human mortality and challenging aging, but that hasn't stopped new tidbits about the well-financed health startup from leaking out. Described as the brainchild of Google Ventures' managing partner Bill Maris, Calico's pitch to investors was to investigate the genetic causes of aging, Fortune reports, rather than targeting individual diseases like cancer.

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Omate TrueSmart smartwatch answers the super-tiny keyboard question

Omate TrueSmart smartwatch answers the super-tiny keyboard question

While the masses decide whether or not they'll be slapping a smartwatch on their wrist this upcoming wearable computers season, the team behind Omate TrueSmart are hard at work on the details. This week SlashGear presents an extended interview with Omate's own Nick N.M. Yap, one of three of the company's founders and major supporter of the TrueSmart smartwatch. Today we're having a peek at a key question - how does one handle an on-screen keyboard with a display that's just 1.54-inches in size?

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