Results for "wearable computer"

Google Glass bone conduction earpiece tipped for private audio

Google Glass bone conduction earpiece tipped for private audio

Google has used bone conduction for its Project Glass wearable computer, it's claimed, promising discrete notifications that only the wearer themselves can hear. The headset makes contact with the mastoid process, linked directly to the middle ear, insiders tell Geek, meaning any audio output - such as new messages, Google+ alerts, or other notifications - is piped in directly, completely inaudible to those around the Glass owner, and yet can still be perceived despite high background noise.

Continue Reading

Microsoft’s Google Glass rival tech tips AR for live events

Microsoft’s Google Glass rival tech tips AR for live events

Microsoft is working on its own Google Glass alternative, a wearable computer which can overlay real-time data onto a user's view of the world around them. The research, outed in a patent application published today for "Event Augmentation with Real-Time Information" (No. 20120293548), centers on a special set of digital eyewear with one or both lenses capable of injecting computer graphics and text into the user's line of sight, such as to label players in a sports game, flag up interesting statistics, or even identify objects and offer contextually-relevant information about them.

Continue Reading

Nexus 10 caught snapping Google exec’s holiday photos

Nexus 10 caught snapping Google exec’s holiday photos

Google's Vic Gundotra has been doing some Samsung Nexus 10 teasing, using the unannounced but broadly-expected Android tablet to share some holiday snaps on Google+. Gundotra does not mention the tablet by name, but the Nexus 10 is listed as the identifier of the camera under the photo details on a number of shots. The resolution is given as roughly 3-megapixels, though since Google+ automatically resizes shots automatically uploaded, that's not necessarily the full resolution of the Nexus 10's camera itself.

Continue Reading

Quantigraphic camera promises HDR eyesight from Father of AR

Quantigraphic camera promises HDR eyesight from Father of AR

Augmented reality isn't just a gimmick for Google Glass and Nokia City Lens, but could make industrial work safer and improve visibility for those with partial sight, according to new research. The team at Eyetap, led by "father of AR" Professor Steve Mann, has cooked up a so-called quantigraphic camera for a new WeldCam HDRchitecture (HDRchitecture) helmet that rather than simply mask the bright lighting produced by welding equipment, actually uses HDR photography techniques to pick out the details the wearer most needs to see.

Continue Reading

Google Glass controls and Artificial Intelligence detailed

Google Glass controls and Artificial Intelligence detailed

Google's cautious approach to allowing people to play with Project Glass means the UI of the wearable computer is something of a mystery, but a new patent application could spill some of the secrets. The wordy "Head-mounted display that displays a visual representation of physical interaction with an input interface located outside of the field of view" details a system whereby a preview of the controls of a wearable - such as the side-mounted touchpad on Google Glass - are floated virtually in the user's line of sight. The application also suggests Glass might maintain its own "self-awareness" of the environment, reacting as appropriate without instruction from the user.

Continue Reading

Will Google Glass Help Us Remember Too Well?

Will Google Glass Help Us Remember Too Well?

When Google sent BASE jumpers hurtling from a blimp as part of the first day Google I/O Keynote presentation, I was barely impressed. The jumpers were demonstrating the Project Glass wearable computer that Google is developing, and which I and just about all of my friends are lusting over. I had seen plenty of skydivers jumping with wearable cameras strapped to them. Then the Googlers landed, and another team started riding BMX bikes on the roof of the Moscone center, where the conference is being held. Yawn. Finally, climbers rappelled down the side of the building. Ho-hum. The point seemed to be that Google Glass was real, and that the glasses would not fall off your face as you fell onto San Francisco from a zeppelin. But then Google showed something that blew my mind.

Continue Reading

Google Project Glass: exponential smartphone streamlining

Google Project Glass: exponential smartphone streamlining

Google's Project Glass will distill the sort of smartphone tasks that might take a minute into 2-4 second simplicity, lead project manager Steve Lee claims, sharing snippets on prototyping as he outlines the wearable display. "People clearly have a desire to be connected to the Internet" Lee told Fast Company Design. "We thought that was a really interesting problem to solve: trying to get technology out of the way while allowing people to still be connected out in the real world."

Continue Reading

Augmented Reality escapes apps for mobile browser

Augmented Reality escapes apps for mobile browser

Augmented reality is set to escape apps and arrive in the browser, according to industry stalwarts, Wikitude, which has a new version of its AR technology that does away with siloed apps. Wikitude AR Window allows webpage developers to access the camera on a smartphone or tablet and display a live view from it, complete with real-time overlays of relevant information, something that would previously have required a separate download.

Continue Reading