Results for "wearable computer"

Google Glass controls and Artificial Intelligence detailed

Google Glass controls and Artificial Intelligence detailed

Google's cautious approach to allowing people to play with Project Glass means the UI of the wearable computer is something of a mystery, but a new patent application could spill some of the secrets. The wordy "Head-mounted display that displays a visual representation of physical interaction with an input interface located outside of the field of view" details a system whereby a preview of the controls of a wearable - such as the side-mounted touchpad on Google Glass - are floated virtually in the user's line of sight. The application also suggests Glass might maintain its own "self-awareness" of the environment, reacting as appropriate without instruction from the user.

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Will Google Glass Help Us Remember Too Well?

Will Google Glass Help Us Remember Too Well?

When Google sent BASE jumpers hurtling from a blimp as part of the first day Google I/O Keynote presentation, I was barely impressed. The jumpers were demonstrating the Project Glass wearable computer that Google is developing, and which I and just about all of my friends are lusting over. I had seen plenty of skydivers jumping with wearable cameras strapped to them. Then the Googlers landed, and another team started riding BMX bikes on the roof of the Moscone center, where the conference is being held. Yawn. Finally, climbers rappelled down the side of the building. Ho-hum. The point seemed to be that Google Glass was real, and that the glasses would not fall off your face as you fell onto San Francisco from a zeppelin. But then Google showed something that blew my mind.

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Google Project Glass: exponential smartphone streamlining

Google Project Glass: exponential smartphone streamlining

Google's Project Glass will distill the sort of smartphone tasks that might take a minute into 2-4 second simplicity, lead project manager Steve Lee claims, sharing snippets on prototyping as he outlines the wearable display. "People clearly have a desire to be connected to the Internet" Lee told Fast Company Design. "We thought that was a really interesting problem to solve: trying to get technology out of the way while allowing people to still be connected out in the real world."

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Augmented Reality escapes apps for mobile browser

Augmented Reality escapes apps for mobile browser

Augmented reality is set to escape apps and arrive in the browser, according to industry stalwarts, Wikitude, which has a new version of its AR technology that does away with siloed apps. Wikitude AR Window allows webpage developers to access the camera on a smartphone or tablet and display a live view from it, complete with real-time overlays of relevant information, something that would previously have required a separate download.

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Google admits Project Glass UI falls well short of promo video

Google admits Project Glass UI falls well short of promo video

Google has admitted that the view through its Project Glass wearable computer won't quite be the Terminator-style augmented reality that its eye-catching demo video initially suggested. Rather than full-view overlays of context-based information and buttons, a Google spokesperson confirmed to CNET, Project Glass' display will hover in the wearer's vision "about where the edge of an umbrella might be." Meanwhile, there's news from the patent office about the physical design of the headset.

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Project Glass shares snapshot and gets Google exec outing

Project Glass shares snapshot and gets Google exec outing

Google continues its Project Glass public testing, sharing new samples from the wearable computer's camera, while Google+ chief Vic Gundotra has jumped on the augmented reality bandwagon too. Gundotra was snapped sporting a Project Glass prototype by colleague Bradley Horowitz, though his feedback on the headset was minimal: "Having a fun day at work today. Go Project Glass!" he wrote.

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From Cyborgs to Project Glass: the Augmented Reality Story

From Cyborgs to Project Glass: the Augmented Reality Story

Google's Project Glass has been through the usual story arc - rumors, a mind-blowing concept demo, rabid excitement, practicality doubts and then simmering mistrust - in a concentrated three month period, but the back story to augmented reality is in its fifth decade. The desire to integrate virtual graphics with the real-world in a seamless way can be traced back to the days when computers could do little more than trace a few wireframes on a display; it's been a work-in-progress ever since. If Google's vision left you reeling, the path AR has taken - and where it might go next - could blow your mind.

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Kinect PC becomes digital projector parrot thanks to Microsoft Research

Kinect PC becomes digital projector parrot thanks to Microsoft Research

Is that a Kinect on your shoulder, or are you just pleased to see me? Microsoft Research has indulged in a little motion-tracking experimentation and come up with the Wearable Multitouch Projector, the 21st-century equivalent of a pirate's useful parrot. A combination of a Kinect sensor bar and a portable projector, the wearable PC can create a virtual display on any wall, notepad, desk or even your hand, tracking movements and gestures as you interact with your data.

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Forget Embarrassment, I’d Wear Google’s AR Glasses

Forget Embarrassment, I’d Wear Google’s AR Glasses

I'm a geek, an early-adopter and a lover of science-fiction; I also have relatively little shame: of course I'm the ideal target audience for Google Glasses. If the rumors are to be believed, Google's wily engineers have used their "20-percent time" to cook up some Android-powered digital goggles, overlaying augmented reality data onto the real-world view. The first generation is likely to be oversized and expensive, but I'll still probably buy them anyway and wear them with pride. Here's why, and what I think Google needs to do if its Google Glasses are to succeed.

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