Results for "transparency"

SEER AR Helmet lets you see the world in 100 degree field of view

SEER AR Helmet lets you see the world in 100 degree field of view

Meet SEER developed by Caputer Labs, Inc. It boasts the world's largest 100 degree field of view for an augmented reality helmet. This field of view in SEER's "Immersive Augmented Reality Experience" is designed be be so large, that it becomes frameless. Its open source and controller flexibility create a uniquely immersive AR experience. The field of view on this device is massive. At 100 degrees horizontal, It compares to seeing a 200 inch (5.08 meter) from eight feet away. This is huge compared to Google Glass's 25 inches (63.5 centimeters).

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Finally! Xbox One, meet Screenshots

Finally! Xbox One, meet Screenshots

It is almost mind boggling that such a basic need, like taking a screenshot to boast about your latest in-game triumph, would take so long to implement. But they say that good things come to those who wait, and those who wait need to wait just a little bit longer. Screenshot capability is finally coming to the Xbox One console when the latest system update rolls to everyone in March. Fortunately, that's not the only reason to be excited about this update.

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Obama signs divisive cyberthreat bill amid privacy fears

Obama signs divisive cyberthreat bill amid privacy fears

President Obama publicly signed the executive order driving through new cyber security legislation today, using an appearance at Stanford to discuss the controversial balance of privacy and protection. The bill - already a topic of fierce debate in Congress, which had continually refused to pass it - demands greater information sharing between government and private industry, "sharing appropriate information" as relevant to ensure vital infrastructure isn't compromised by hackers or malicious governments. However, exactly what counts as "appropriate", and what impact that has on individual privacy, remains to be seen.

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HTC delays Lollipop for carrier models of One M7 and M8

HTC delays Lollipop for carrier models of One M7 and M8

Rome wasn't built in a day, and some things take more than 90 days to make. After starting a new trend of transparency among manufacturers, HTC is now effectively breaking its 90-day guarantee. It has announced that it will take longer for carrier versions of its 2013 and 2014 One flagship to get their Android 5.0 dessert and it is explaining, though very briefly, why. And although one can't probably argue quality vs speed, some might ask why it took so long before HTC formally acknowledged the delay.

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Fantastic 4 reboot trailer: showing real promise

Fantastic 4 reboot trailer: showing real promise

The same studio that brought you the X-Men movies is giving a bit of a reboot to the Fantastic Four. The first couple of Fantastic Four (or Fantastic 4, if you prefer) films didn't do so hot - the actor who played Johnny Storm left the project to become Captain America with Marvel, if that's any indicator - now it's time to give the title a kick in the pants. Instead of continuing to roll with the same cast and the same plot, 20th Century Fox is bringing heat with a "re-imagining" of the team.

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Gmail revived in China but block remains a mystery

Gmail revived in China but block remains a mystery

Gmail access has apparently returned to China, with users of the email service in the country reporting that the four day outage which nobody would take responsibility for seems to have come to an end. Google's POP and IMAP servers were unexpectedly unavailable over the weekend, with widespread claims that the "Great Firewall" China's government relies upon to limit access to the internet had clamped down on another victim. Just as suddenly, though, emails have begun to make it through, and Google's own metrics indicate a slight rise in Chinese traffic to Gmail.

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Google “right to be forgotten” tool should be global says EU

Google “right to be forgotten” tool should be global says EU

Google's "right to be forgotten" tool was grudgingly implemented in Europe back in May, but now privacy regulators are pushing to scale up the web search censoring system to cover global results, not just those localized to countries in the EU. The ruling - which affects all search engines operating in Europe, though Google is the clear leader with an estimated 90-percent market share there - allows individuals the right to request the removal of links to information "inadequate, irrelevant, or no longer relevant," and at launch saw 12,000 requests in a single day.

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Is Facebook’s privacy update welcome or whitewash?

Is Facebook’s privacy update welcome or whitewash?

Listen to Mark Zuckerberg & Co., and Facebook's privacy changes this week are not only benign but in your very best interest. A pared down explanation on data protection that's ostensibly clearer than before, as well as a guide to exactly what the privacy settings can do, were the sweetener to the side news that Facebook would actually be doing more information sharing, at least between its recent acquisitions like Instagram and WhatsApp. Problem is, we've heard those same explanations before, and they've already got at least one big company into very hot water.

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Can you trust Comcast about net neutrality?

Can you trust Comcast about net neutrality?

With President Obama noting his stance on net neutrality yesterday, it gave a big push to proponents of a free and open flow of information. The “last mile” debate will still go on, with various ISPs making their position known, likely behind closed doors. One of the largest, Comcast, posted their stance on the issue today via their blog. Titled “Surprise! We agree with the President’s principles on net neutrality”, Comcast is firmly backing what we want, but may not be in favor of how we want to achieve it.

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President Obama officially wants a free and open Internet

President Obama officially wants a free and open Internet

Nearing the end of his second and final term, President Obama is attempting to leave us with the Internet we all want. The ongoing discussion about “net neutrality” is nuanced in some very important ways, but Obama is on our side. Via a statement and accompanying video, Obama says he is urging the FCC to “do everything they can to protect net neutrality for everyone”. No “fast lanes”, no “tiered offerings”, no nonsense. Our President wants a free and open Internet, too.

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