Results for "transparency"

Reddit’s first Transparency Report shows few data requests

Reddit’s first Transparency Report shows few data requests

Because it's January, companies have been dropping their latest transparency reports detailing government data requests from the second half of 2014 -- we saw Dropbox's earlier this morning, for example. Reddit, being the massively popular website that it is, is no doubt hit with data requests, but as its first-ever Transparency Report shows, they're relatively few and far between. Despite having 174 million or so regular visitors, the site was the recipient of only 55 user data requests in 2014.

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Dropbox Transparency Report for latter 2014 adds more details

Dropbox Transparency Report for latter 2014 adds more details

Dropbox is one of many companies that provides regular transparency reports, something it started doing a few years ago with a steadily increasing number of details. The cloud storage company has released its report for the second half of 2014 (July to December), and with it likewise comes an increase in details, the most notable of which is the inclusion of data on government data requests that come from outside of the US, making it more relevant for non-US users.

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Google transparency report details content govs wanted nixed

Google transparency report details content govs wanted nixed

Earlier today, Google published its latest transparency report, and as with past ones it includes information on government data requests from around the globe. One big difference, however, is the inclusion of more than two dozen examples of content removal requests received from governments -- a first for the transparency reports, and an interesting look at what kind of content catches the attention of various agencies and entities. The content removal requests are detailed for past periods in addition to the latest reported period from July to December 2013.

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Google releases “Right to be Forgotten” transparency report

Google releases “Right to be Forgotten” transparency report

When Google was made to start accepting and acknowledging URL takedown requests in Europe — the famed “Right to be Forgotten” issue — they were almost immediately inundated with more than they could handle. In the first day alone, Google received over 12,000 requests from netizens, and it doesn’t look to have slowed down much. Yesterday, Google released info about those takedown requests, and the metrics are staggering. In the short time it’s been available, Google has seen over half a million takedown submissions.

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Twitter fights for more transparency, sues DOJ

Twitter fights for more transparency, sues DOJ

Twitter wants you to know what information the Government is looking for. Sadly, they’re bound by restrictions which prevent them from releasing such granular info about requests made of them. In a move that will push the boundaries of transparency, Twitter is taking the U.S. Government to court for the ability to offer that info.

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NSA Transparency Report is in the last place you’d look

NSA Transparency Report is in the last place you’d look

Like so many of our favorite tech companies are doing lately, the NSA has released a “transparency” report. The scope of the report is to give us a better idea of just what the NSA was up to in 2013. Unfortunately, just like some of the other reports we see, it doesn’t give a lot of detail, and may not even be useful in many cases.

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AT&T DOJ transparency report shows 300k+ government data demands

AT&T DOJ transparency report shows 300k+ government data demands

It’s AT&T up next with their transparency report regarding the United States Department of Justice and the amount of demands they’ve been sent over the past year. These demands are of several different varieties, one category for National Security, another for U.S. Criminal & Civil Litigation Demands. While National Security demands are still stuck in the stacks between zero and nine-hundred and ninety-nine, localized crime searching is a bit more specific.

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