Results for "tokyoflash"

Tokyoflash stainless steel S-Mode Oberon watch

Tokyoflash stainless steel S-Mode Oberon watch

Despite the fact that they're, generally, frustratingly difficult to tell the time from, I do have a soft spot for Tokyoflash watches. One of the company's more recent designs, the Oberon, has been diving in and out of stock for a while now, but they're celebrating a return to availability with the launch of a new, stainless steel variant. The S-Mode Oberon SS uses three rings of blue LEDs to indicate date and time.

TokyoFlash Tibida not for the faint of heart, but for those 10 types of people

TokyoFlash Tibida not for the faint of heart, but for those 10 types of people

Please excuse my cheesy little binary joke, but this watch will work with both types of people, those that can read binary and those that can’t as the 42-LED array is arranged in such a way that you can choose to tell time in binary or other methods. Those other methods include hour centric or minute centric, basically the watch will print out the number of the minute or the hour kind of like your old high school’s score board.

Tokyoflash Morse Code Watch Annoying As Hell

Tokyoflash Morse Code Watch Annoying As Hell

Sure, Tokyoflash has put out some moderately annoying, and hard to tell time timepieces before, but I really think this one takes the cake. Sure the picture of the Morse Code Watch shows the time rather straightforwardly, but don’t let that confuse you.

Its true mission is to give you a brain aneurysm while trying to figure out the time. Apparently there are three different “code” modes, one of which is Morse, the other two, I have yet to find an article or retailer even hinting as to what they are other than to say you probably need secret service training from somewhere to figure them out.

1000100101 Time Watch By Tokyoflash

1000100101 Time Watch By Tokyoflash

If you like weird, eccentric, and cryptic time displays then you'll salivate over the 1000100101 by none other than Tokyoflash. This 1960 classic accessory is absolute Bond and it knows what to do best; confuse your friends. It's straight out of a Star Trek episode with lights flashing and countless patterns that display the time. As far as durability, it's top of the line featuring a metal panel and carbon fiber style strap to weather the elements.

It passes the cool factor test but it lacks additional features which would, of course, require a screen. The standard features include AM & PM, month, date, and day of the week. In addition, buyers might like the automatic light-up feature which is set at 15 minutes. You can also select pre-programmed light patterns to impress your friends or contact outer space if you have that capability.

Price: $85.22 (approx. ¥9800)

1000100101 Watch [Via: Tokyoflash]

Tokyoflash Retrofit Watch

Tokyoflash Retrofit Watch

Time and tide waits for no man, they say.  Well, I can't help you with the tide - ever since my grandmother was swallowed practically whole by some quicksand during a holiday on the East coast of Scotland I've been petrified of the sea - but time, yes, I am your wristwatch saviour.

Run, don't walk, to Tokyoflash and snap up this chunkily gorgeous retro-styled timepiece.  Slick with bargain juice at a paltry $128, it's a great two-fingered salute to the drably predictable "waterproof to 100m" multi-dial divers' watches men are supposed to like.

Retrofit Product Page [Tokyoflash]

Shine activity tracker hits Apple Stores to challenge Flex and Fuelband

Shine activity tracker hits Apple Stores to challenge Flex and Fuelband

Activity tracker Shine is headed to Apple Stores this week, with the discrete wearable the latest option in health monitoring to follow in the footsteps of Nike's Fuelband and Jawbone's UP. Initially funded by an Indiegogo campaign late last year, Shine is arguably the most attractive of the health dongles we've seen so far, being a simple metal disc with hidden LEDs to show your daily progress or the current time.

Continue Reading

Pebble talks developers, apps, watchfaces and future-proofing

Pebble talks developers, apps, watchfaces and future-proofing

The first Pebble developer SDK is already in limited testing, the company has confirmed, allowing coders to create custom watchfaces for the smartwatch. Pebble is paving the way for new features that won't be in the initial feature-set, too; although it uses Bluetooth 2.1 to connect currently, there's actually a Bluetooth 4.0 chip inside for lower-power wireless in the future, and there's an ambient light sensor which developers will also be able to tap into. On the software side, there's If This Then That integration for extra flexibility. Read on for more details.

Continue Reading

1 2 3 4 5 6 7