Search Results for: sopa

Facebook’s Zuckerberg blasts SOPA and PIPA

Facebook’s Zuckerberg blasts SOPA and PIPA

There's been no lack of smashing on the SOPA and PIPA bills in Washington today specifically because of the "blackout" agreement everyone appears to have silently agreed on - one name everyone should have been waiting on, a name that's now in the ring against the bills where he should be, is Mark Zuckerberg. The face of Facebook has brought out his company in force with a small note on his own Facebook page, saying that they will "continue to oppose any laws that will hurt the internet."

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Google assists SOPA Blackout sites with slowed web crawlers

Google assists SOPA Blackout sites with slowed web crawlers

Today there's one gigantic mass of SOPA and PIPA protests across the web, most of them taking the form of a total blackout of the sites participating - what Google has done to assist in these sites rankings within the search results of their site is to slow down their web crawlers. What this does for you, the blackout protestor, is to affect your page ranking in Google enough that you don't have to worry about having to climb your way back up into the results tomorrow when the blackout is done. Those of you that rely on Google for hits should rejoice and be glad.

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SOPA and PIPA are the Wrong Way to Tackle Piracy

SOPA and PIPA are the Wrong Way to Tackle Piracy

Anti-SOPA and anti-PIPA protests have begun in force today, with sites like Wikipedia giving the internet a taste of a web without freedom of speech, as censorship and piracy take center stage for lawmakers, content-owners and users alike. The proposed acts are, we believe, a heavy-handed and naive approach toward the legitimate issue of content theft. Being against the proposed acts isn't the same as being "pro-piracy"; that's why we here at SlashGear (and R3 Media, the company behind SlashGear), as avid content-creators and content-consumers, believe SOPA and PIPA are the wrong way to tackle piracy online.

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Wikipedia anti-SOPA blackout underway

Wikipedia anti-SOPA blackout underway

Wikipedia has entered a twenty-four hour blackout in protest of SOPA and PIPA, the US anti-piracy acts currently giving free-internet advocates headaches. Visit any English-language Wikipedia page and instead of a crowd-sourced entry you'll be prompted to "Imagine a world without free knowledge" as well as offered links to spread the message. Meanwhile, Google has opened up some of its historically whitespace homepage for an anti-SOPA call to arms, while other sites prepare to go dark.

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SOPA to be resurrected after blackout protests

SOPA to be resurrected after blackout protests

With growing opposition against the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), an imminent blackout protest to kick off tomorrow, and a postponed vote on the legislation, it seemed as though SOPA was close to being dead. But that's not the case, reminds the legislation's creator and House Judiciary Committee Chairman Lamar Smith. In a press release today, Smith said he expects the committee to continue marking up the bill in February.

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SlashGear 101: SOPA and PIPA explained in plain English

SlashGear 101: SOPA and PIPA explained in plain English

If you've not heard of either SOPA or PIPA in the last few weeks and months in your journeys through the internet, now's the time to get educated, and quick. While the most recent news has been that the White House reaction to the SOPA bill specifically has effectively curbed it, there's no reason why it can't pop up again with a different name or a couple of simple changes that allow it to pass silently. These two bills, SOPA and PIPA, are amongst the most dangerous pieces of legislature ever to be written up for passage by the United States government in regards to innovation and the free market on a global scale today: this post will tell you why.

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Wikipedia blackout a “broad global message” about SOPA/PIPA peril says Wales

Wikipedia blackout a “broad global message” about SOPA/PIPA peril says Wales

Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales has defended the online encyclopedia's decision to stage a global blackout in protest of SOPA and PIPA this week, arguing "US law, as it impacts the internet, can affect everyone." Wales hopes the blackout - which will see the English-language version of Wikipedia replaced with an open letter encouraging US citizens to contact their Representatives and voice their concerns with the Stop Online Piracy Act and Protect Intellectual Property Act - will prompt even those outside of the US to contact friends and family living there and encourage them to speak up on the proposed legislation, he told the Telegraph, as "a broad global message" about censorship.

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Wikipedia joining Wednesday’s anti-SOPA blackout

Wikipedia joining Wednesday’s anti-SOPA blackout

Wikipedia has decided to join the protest against the Stop Online Piracy Act and the Protect IP Act by shutting down its English site for 24 hours on Wednesday, January 18. It will be joining companies like Reddit, which had announced last week that it would go offline for 12 hours on Wednesday. Both sites will temporarily shutdown and display only a message urging against the SOPA and PIPA legislation.

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SOPA shelved after Obama announcement

SOPA shelved after Obama announcement

Opponent of the Stop Online Piracy Act, California congressman Darrell Issa noted today that he'd been told by House majority leader Eric Cantor that there would be no vote on SOPA "unless there is consensus on the bill," this essentially shelving the project until further notice. This move "effectively scuppers" SOPA, as the Guardian notes, and puts pressure on the next most notorious bill regarding these matters, the e-Parasite act, as it comes to a vote on January 24th. This is the victory we've been waiting for, folks, unless you're a big media company that hoped to mis-use the bill, of course.

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Obama’s geeks speak out on SOPA

Obama’s geeks speak out on SOPA

The US government has responded to the internet uproar over the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and PROTECT IP Act (PIPA), promising that any acts challenging piracy will not go to the House of Representatives without consensus being found first. "While we believe that online piracy by foreign websites is a serious problem that requires a serious legislative response," President Obama's IP, technology and cybersecurity chiefs wrote today, "we will not support legislation that reduces freedom of expression, increases cybersecurity risk, or undermines the dynamic, innovative global Internet."

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