Results for "plex"

MIT’s MultiFab 3D printer can handle 10 materials at once

MIT’s MultiFab 3D printer can handle 10 materials at once

3D printers are great, useful, and fun, but the typical hobbyist printer that you can buy for yourself or for your home business has a problem with single-mindedness. For one, it can only really produce one part at a time, leaving the task of assembling parts together into a functional whole to humans. For another, it can only work with one material at a time, though more professional, and more expensive, 3D printers can work with up to three. MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory or CSAIL, however, has a solution that solves both of those at a fraction of the cost of a professional 3D printer.

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Android lock patterns analyzed, deemed predictable

Android lock patterns analyzed, deemed predictable

The other day I picked up a co-workers phone lying on the desk and noticed that you could clearly see the greasy smudges on the screen of the phone highlighting the lock pattern of the device. I probably could have been into that phone in a few minutes. As it turns out Android lock patters are somewhat predictable according to a graduate student who has been studying them.

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Aztec skull rack may reveal thousands of decapitated human heads

Aztec skull rack may reveal thousands of decapitated human heads

Archaeologists in Mexico have revealed a skull rack found in the ruins of the Templo Mayor complex in Tenochtitlan. This is in modern Mexico City where the Museo del Templo Mayor now resides. As the museum displays history above, so do archaeologists continue to excavate below. Their most recent find is a skull rack built between 1485 and 1502, coming in at a cool 40-feet (12-meters) by 112-feet (34-meters), packed full of human skulls. Archaeologists on the case believe they've found the "Huey Tzompantli", or Main skull rack of the complex.

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Amazon gives smart bulb devs the keys to Alexa’s voice

Amazon gives smart bulb devs the keys to Alexa’s voice

Amazon is further opening up its Alexa voice-control system, the engine at the heart of the Echo speaker, to smart lighting companies. The Alexa Skills Kit was launched back in June, breaking the cloud-based digital assistant out of Echo and allowing it to be embedded in new devices and taught third-party skills. Now, with a new Alexa Lighting API, those skills are expanding to deal with more complex sets of wireless bulbs.

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Meat-eating dinosaurs: special serrations kept teeth extra sharp

Meat-eating dinosaurs: special serrations kept teeth extra sharp

Meat-eating dinosaurs have serrated edges on their teeth, which is nothing new. However, the extent and complexity of those serrations has only just recently been observed, with researchers noting that the serrations include “deep folds” where each serrated part begins. These folds were originally thought to be cracks resulting from the force of the dinosaur’s biting, but a more extensive look at teeth from multiple creatures has revealed the special serrations were common among flesh-eating dinosaurs, serving to keep their teeth as sharp as possible for as long as possible.

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Dragon Anywhere brings Nuance dictation to iPhone and Android

Dragon Anywhere brings Nuance dictation to iPhone and Android

Nuance may be part of the voice recognition magic behind Siri, but its latest product, Dragon Anywhere, promises to outclass the speech-to-text skills of both iOS and Android. The new app focuses on those who expect uninterrupted dictation from their mobile devices, along with full document editing, formatting, and even distribution done by voice. Ambitious, not least because both Apple and Google have baked some of those technologies straight into their platforms; I caught up with Nuance's Peter Mahoney, CMO, to find out more.

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Fotokite Phi drone is a flying camera on a leash

Fotokite Phi drone is a flying camera on a leash

While consumers drones become more advanced with features, the way to use them through remote controls or mobile apps also becomes more complex. Drone maker Fotokite has debuted its first consumer model, the Phi, that aims to make aerial photography as easy as holding a leash. The Phi has the now-standard quadcopter design, but with a retractable tether, allowing it to fly between 1 and 26 feet away from the operator, while automatically recording from a user-supplied GoPro camera.

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Qualcomm focuses on VR for new flagship Snapdragon

Qualcomm focuses on VR for new flagship Snapdragon

Qualcomm may not be powering the Galaxy Note 5, but the company is looking further afield for applications of its upcoming Snapdragon 820, with an emphasis on VR. The new chip, which is expected to begin appearing in devices in the first half of 2016, is likely to figure strongly in smartphones and tablets - areas in which Qualcomm already has a sizable footprint. However, ambitions for the processor are far broader than that, with specific hardware decisions made to satisfy virtual reality applications.

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Sesame Street gets “exclusive” with HBO

Sesame Street gets “exclusive” with HBO

Sesame Street is about to break standards for television shows that've been on for 45 seasons. Not that a lot of shows have been on for that long, of course. But here the Sesame Street show is prepared not to go off and fade away, but to grow. Signing a deal with HBO, Sesame Workshop has promised five seasons to HBO with "almost twice as much new content as previous seasons." This content will be "exclusive" to HBO for nine months after each episode is aired, after which PBS will be allowed to show reruns for free.

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Lenovo-backed ZUK outs Z1 with multi-talented home button

Lenovo-backed ZUK outs Z1 with multi-talented home button

Another Chinese vendor has joined the smartphone scene, but this time it has the backing of Lenovo to add weight to its name. Simply called ZUK, the manufacturer has announced its first ever smartphone, aptly dubbed the ZUK Z1. A rather odd mix of old and new specs, the Z1 smartphone sports some interesting, if not perplexing, features. All wrapped in a very familiar package. And by that, we mean an overall design that you will most likely quickly associate with a rather fruity smartphone.

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OnePlus 2 vs Moto X Style – which one “potentially” deserves your money?

OnePlus 2 vs Moto X Style – which one “potentially” deserves your money?

Last week we saw not one but two mid-year racehorses make their way into the smartphone tracks. One an established veteran in the industry, the other almost a David in comparison, both putting out mouthwatering offers. But at the end of the day, unless you have the money to spare, you will choose only one. Is the OnePlus 2 really worthy of all the hype the startup generated? Or was the Moto X Style able to repeat the magic of the original Moto X in 2014? Pending a full blown review, we do a spec and feature side-by-side to get a preliminary appraisal.

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Scientists turn up oldest evidence of animal reproduction

Scientists turn up oldest evidence of animal reproduction

Some of the world's earliest-known macrofossils have revealed evidence of their revolutionary early reproduction. Scientists publishing research with the scientific journal Nature have studied macrofossils from the late Ediacaran age, from between 580-541 million years ago. In these fossils are the oldest examples of diverse complex organisms found by humans. In these fossils has turned up some of the world's earliest evidence of diverse complex organisms' reproductive abilities. As you might expect, the early complex organisms in this study reproduced asexually for optimum speed and spread.

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