Results for "plastic logic que"

Plastic Logic 100 shatterproof ereader targets classrooms

Plastic Logic 100 shatterproof ereader targets classrooms

Plastic Logic has announced its new ereader, the Plastic Logic 100, a 10.7-inch electronic textbook targeted at education applications. Using the same plastic-based epaper technology as originally intended for the cancelled QUE ereader, the Plastic Logic 100 measures a mere 7.65mm thick and weighs 475g, and has a capacitive touch-controlled 1280 x 960 display and a battery life of a week.

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Plastic Logic color e-paper headed for 2012 volume production

Plastic Logic color e-paper headed for 2012 volume production

Plastic Logic's first product, the business-centric QUE ereader, isn't even in customers' hands yet, but the company are already talking about their follow-up.  They reckon they'll have a manufacturable color e-ink display ready by the end of 2011, and headed into mass production in 2012.  The panel will be based on technology the company already have "working at our Cambridge laboratory" according to Achim Neu at Plastic Logic.

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QUE proReader delayed until summer

QUE proReader delayed until summer

I am not typically one to pre-order products. I like to be able to just walk into a store, buy the thing, and take it home. One of the reasons I don’t like pre-orders is that you never really know when you will get the device until it actually ships. Such is the case with the geeks who pre-ordered the expensive QUE proReader a while back.

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Plastic Logic and Olive Software Teaming Up for Plastic Logic Reader

Plastic Logic and Olive Software Teaming Up for Plastic Logic Reader

Plastic Logic announced today that Olive Software will be a key service provider and partner for the Plastic Logic Publishers Program. Together, they plan on developing content publishing solutions that enable major newspapers, magazines, web content, and other publishers to simply and efficiently optimize and distribute their content for the company's forthcoming eReader. The Plastic Logic Reader is designed specifically for mobile business professionals, and is due in the market in early 2010.

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SlashGear Week in Review – Week 2 2010

SlashGear Week in Review – Week 2 2010

The week of CES each year is a week that geeks in the industry and geek consumers look forward too with glee. At the same time those of us who have been to the show have to temper the gadget lust we get going into the show with the knowledge that his is one of the most grueling weeks of the year to be a pro geek. Just look at the number of new items announced this week; it was hard to even whittle the list down to some of the coolest gear of the week for our second week in review of 2010.

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This futuristic exoskeleton convinced me to take aging seriously

This futuristic exoskeleton convinced me to take aging seriously

One day you will die, but, before then - and assuming all goes to plan - you’ll be trapped in an old body. Failing eyesight, hearing plagued with tinnitus, and limbs progressively seizing until just getting up from your chair is a challenge too great: death may be considered the biggest taboo, but aging is arguably a more uncomfortable one. With all that to look forward to, it’s no surprise that nobody wants to talk about getting old. Could a futuristic exoskeleton kick-start that conversation?

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2016 Volvo XC90 first-drive – Scandinavia on wheels

2016 Volvo XC90 first-drive – Scandinavia on wheels

Nordic noir has invaded our television and our bookshelves, and now Volvo wants to do the same for luxury SUVs with the all-new 2016 XC90. As many companies, automotive and otherwise have discovered, throwing money at a problem isn’t necessarily the best way to fix it. Nonetheless, it helps to have deep pockets when you’re tasked with completely reinventing your line-up, and Volvo has spent over $11bn since it was sold to Geely in 2010 and began to rebuild its range from the ground up. Now, we’re getting a taste of what that money bought, and like moody Scandinavian detectives, it turns out to be complicated.

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