Results for "pelican"

Tough Pelican Case is your Notebook’s Bodyguard

Tough Pelican Case is your Notebook’s Bodyguard

When Vincent tested the OtterBox Rugged Laptop Case back in August, he ran it over with his Toyota 4Runner just to make sure it was up to the honoured task of protecting his MacBook.  I wonder if Pelican will let him do the same with their 1495 Laptop Case, which they're claiming is water proof, crush proof, dust and chemical resistant.  Securing with a combination lock, as well as sporting stainless-steel-clad padlock hoops if you're extra anal about safety, it will take up to a 17-inch notebook and a whole bunch of cables, media and the other gumph we insist on carrying around with us.

What do you think, guys, fancy sending SlashGear a 1495 and letting Vincent test it out in his own indomitable way?  The Pelican 1495 range starts at $119.46 and is available from Shipping Cases Now.

Press Release [via Laptoping]

Meet the chip that wants to make your smartphone an SLR

Meet the chip that wants to make your smartphone an SLR

Mobile chips don't necessarily need to get faster, they just need to get smarter, at least that's what video processing specialist Movidius believes, and it's launching a highly-focused vision processor, Myriad 2, to prove it. The follow-up to the original Myriad 1 co-processor - found inside Google's Project Tango 3D-scanning tablet - Myriad 2 promises a 20x boost in performance at computational photography, such as real-time mapping, 360-degree panoramic video, and more, all with the eventual goal of making the cameras we carry as clever as human vision. I caught up with Movidius CEO Remi El-Ouazzane to find out why you might want Myriad 2 inside your next smartphone or wearable.

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Lytro camera hits UK as rivals ready their retorts

Lytro camera hits UK as rivals ready their retorts

Lytro has landed in the UK, with the clever light-field camera finally up for sale, though rivals have already begun to circle. The camera, which allows the user to focus on different parts of the frame after the image has been taken, by recording the angles that light hit the sensor, went on sale in the US in early 2012, and was hailed as somewhere between a curiosity and a real advance in photography.

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SlashGear 101: Nokia PureView

SlashGear 101: Nokia PureView

Smartphone buyers pick handsets on the basis of cameras, that's what the big manufacturers have realized, and Nokia is determined not to be left behind. As well as transitioning to lead the Windows Phone charge, the Finnish company is also positioning itself as the most imaginative firm in mobile photography, putting snapshots at the core of every recent device. One name stands out as special to any mobile photo pro, however, and that's PureView, expected to crop up again with the imminent launch of the Nokia Lumia 1020. There's a lot to be said for 41-megapixel cameras: read on, as we walk you why PureView is special, and what might come next.

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Lensless multiview camera cleverer than Lytro and PureView combined

Lensless multiview camera cleverer than Lytro and PureView combined

A lensless, focussing-free camera that can take photos from multiple angles simultaneously, building up either different perspectives of a scene or combining data to produce faster, higher-detail images, could revolutionize the digital camera industry, its developers have teased. The prototype, developed by a team led by Hong Jiang at Bell Labs, eschews traditional glass or plastic lenses and replaces them with an LCD panel that works as a dynamic aperture. Using the system, multiple imaging sensors can in fact share the same aperture.

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Nokia smartphone chief teases Lytro-style “computational photography” up next

Nokia smartphone chief teases Lytro-style “computational photography” up next

Nokia's push to differentiate its Lumia smartphones with PureView camera technology will see "computational imaging" - where shots can be tweaked and modified thanks to clever lens tech - come to the fore, smart devices chief Jo Harlow has teased. "Being able to capture even more data [is an area of exploration]" Harlow told DNA, "data you cannot even see with the human eye that you can only see by actually going back to the picture and being able to do things with them." The comments are already being seen as further evidence that array cameras from Nokia-invested Pelican Imaging could show up in Lumia devices sooner rather than later.

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Nokia CEO faces investor revolt: “Switch to another road” is demand

Nokia CEO faces investor revolt: “Switch to another road” is demand

Nokia CEO Stephen Elop faces renewed criticism from shareholders this week, with attendees at the annual general meeting mincing no words in demanding the Finnish firm reconsider its devotion to Windows Phone. Elop conceded during the investor event that the Nokia leadership "make adjustments as we go," but insisted that Lumia and Windows Phone remained the best way forward, Reuters reports. That confidence wasn't enough to placate outspoken critics, however, with one questioning whether the chief exec was "aware that results are what matter."

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DiveBot hits indegogo as $1300 remote-control underwater robot

DiveBot hits indegogo as $1300 remote-control underwater robot

This week the folks behind F5 Robotics have revealed DiveBot, also known as the "world's first ready-to-use underwater HD ROV under $1300." That's quite the feat, making such a device at such a price, and it's coming in a way that's no small challenge for the public as well - it'll be crowd-funded on its way to reality. Through the crowd-funding platform indegogo, users will be able to put down an amount of cash that will gain them early access to a final product, knowledge that they helped fun the project, or just a friendly letter saying "thanks!"

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CES 2013 wrap-up: Accessories steal the show

CES 2013 wrap-up: Accessories steal the show

In some ways, one could argue that CES 2013 was really all about the accessories. Sure, a lot of companies where there unveiling new hardware, whether that hardware was a massive TV, a new gaming tablet, or a phone that has an eInk display on the backside, but there were more accessories than we care to count being shown on the floor. Each of these accessories seemed to offer something unique; each was newsworthy in it's own particular way. There were some that caught more attention than others, naturally, but nearly every accessory we saw is bound to get someone, somewhere excited.

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