Results for "path privacy"

Tired of Facebook? Try these three social apps instead

Tired of Facebook? Try these three social apps instead

Are you tired of using social media channels like Facebook to share pics, or schedule a get-together? Sometimes, you just want to create your own little bubble, apart from the larger one that is social media. If you’ve been looking for a way to go “off the social grid”, here are three apps you and your friends can use to forge a new path.

Continue Reading

It’s time for a new breed of Notifications

It’s time for a new breed of Notifications

The digital world is hungry for your eyeballs, and the tools we have to manage and mitigate those potential distractions and filter through the most valuable information are looking increasingly inadequate. How many times has your smartphone buzzed or beeped in your pocket in the last five minutes? The demands on our attention are only going to get more frequent, and it’s time for a new breed of notification to address that.

Continue Reading

Dropbox buys Loom and Hackpad for photo and docs management

Dropbox buys Loom and Hackpad for photo and docs management

Dropbox has snapped up photo sharing and management service Loom, planning to shut it down and lure its users over to the recently announced Dropbox Carousel app, as well as collaborative document system Hackpad. Loom promised to create a single, synchronized gallery of all a user's photos, regardless of which camera or smartphone they were taken on, with simple access from every device.

Continue Reading

Pogoplug Safeplug shifts home web use to Tor for internet secrecy

Pogoplug Safeplug shifts home web use to Tor for internet secrecy

Pogoplug has launched a new privacy adapter, Safeplug, which the company says can add internet anonymity within seconds by re-routing all internet traffic through Tor. The compact box, priced at $49, pushes web use through Tor's randomized path of interconnected computers, which are commonly used by journalists, activists, and others wanting to avoid being observed or located in their internet use. However, Pogoplug apparently thinks that recent NSA spying stories and the threat of hacking is enough to push regular users onto Tor too.

Continue Reading

Google Engineers reply to NSA: “all too often, laws are for the little people”

Google Engineers reply to NSA: “all too often, laws are for the little people”

There are a couple of Google engineers working for the Google security team replying in kind to the NSA and the GCHQ (on the other side of the ocean) regarding the most recent round of Edward Snowden-leaked documents on government snooping into Google and Yahoo cloud networks. What you'll find is a rather everyman-level bit of talk that essentially anyone can understand. Per Google's Mike Hearn: "We designed this system to keep criminals out. There's no ambiguity here."

Continue Reading

NSA, SOPA, CISPA, PATRIOT Act under fire at rally in Washington, D.C.

NSA, SOPA, CISPA, PATRIOT Act under fire at rally in Washington, D.C.

An organized crowd of protesters numbering more than a thousand have convened outside the U.S. Capitol in protest of mass surveillance programs by American spy apparatuses. The rally, which was organized by Stop Watching Us, focuses largely on Internet data gathering efforts by the NSA and other agencies. It is supported by Edward Snowden, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, and hundreds of other technological privacy advocates.

Continue Reading

Li-fi successfully tested at 150 Mbps, say Chinese scientists

Li-fi successfully tested at 150 Mbps, say Chinese scientists

Scientists at Fudan University have successfully transmitted data via "li-fi" at speeds up to 150 Mbps, reports Xinhua News. Li-fi, or "light fidelity", is a theorized way to stream data via LED lighting instead of Wi-Fi. Although still under investigation, the technology could be used in high-speed, visible-path transmission applications. The scientists are scheduled to demonstrate a set of example li-fi kits at the China International Industry Fair on Nov. 5 in Shanghai.

Continue Reading

Cracked Glass: Why wearables are the next security maelstrom

Cracked Glass: Why wearables are the next security maelstrom

Google Glass has plenty of issues. There's a fair chance you'll get laughed at for wearing it, or at the very least stared at. Battery life won't last you a day, and the list of things you can actually do with the wearable is limited. For all the Saturday Night Live skits and "Glasshole" jokes, though, wearables aren't going away, and that means a new set of security problems for those whose job it is to keep data safe. We sat down with Marc Rogers, long-time threat intelligence expert and current Principal Security Researcher at Lookout Mobile Security to talk wearable risks, what happens when your Nest turns against you, and the big Glass elephant in the room.

Continue Reading

EyeEm: the best Instagram alternative you’ve never heard of

EyeEm: the best Instagram alternative you’ve never heard of

In the shockwave that is the Facebook-added Terms of Use for Instagram here as 2012 ends and 2013 begins comes the resurgence of the app called EyeEm - a photo snapping, filtering, and sharing app that you've likely never heard of before today. Though EyeEm has been around for many moons now - over a year on some platforms - it's just this month seeing one whole heck of a lot of renewed interest as a massive exodus from Instagram occurs: and as EyeEm is already established not only on the web, iPhone, and Android, but on Windows Phone 8 as well, it's high time this ecosystem got some traffic.

Continue Reading

1 2 3 4 5