Results for "path privacy"

FTC fines Path app $800,000 over unauthorized data collection [UPDATE]

FTC fines Path app $800,000 over unauthorized data collection [UPDATE]

A year ago Path's app for iPhone received a lot of criticism because it was discovered that the app was accessing users' contacts without permission. The developers quickly made things right and released an update to fix the permissions. However, the FTC caught them anyways and fined them for violating the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (since some users were under 13).

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You Don’t Care About Privacy

You Don’t Care About Privacy

Moral outrage over privacy, tracking and where exactly our personal details end up has been very much in fashion in recent weeks, with Google, app makers and others variously accused of taking advantage of us gullible, innocent users. Congress, the FTC, privacy watchdogs and journalists are each competing to see who can foam most dramatically at the mouth; developers and companies, meanwhile, each struggle to raise the bar when it comes to groveling, heartfelt apologies. Yet few are talking about the root causes of the privacy morass: ignorance, arrogance and entitlement.

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Twitter under fire for privacy blunder

Twitter under fire for privacy blunder

Twitter has admitted to storing email addresses and phone numbers from its mobile users' address books, raising the ire of privacy advocates and forcing the messaging service to rework its iPhone and Android apps. The logs - which could be stored for up to 18 months - are used to identify contacts also using Twitter, the social network told the LATimes, both at the point where users choose "Scan your Contacts" and in the subsequent weeks and months of you using the app.

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Apple privacy changes could impact 1000s of apps

Apple privacy changes could impact 1000s of apps

Potentially thousands of apps could be forced to update when Apple introduces new contact data rules for App Store software, as the company reacts to outcries around content privacy. Apple confirmed the incoming data protection changes yesterday, after popular social network app Path was found to upload each user's contacts to its servers without notifying them first. However, according to research last year, there could be thousands of apps doing similar things.

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Apple releases Contact Data Privacy statement

Apple releases Contact Data Privacy statement

Today Apple has released a statement regarding user's contact data in iOS apps downloaded from the official App Store. This information comes amid allegations that the Path application for iPhone had been harvesting user information without user authorization. Apple's statement today assures users that any application sharing or keeping information belonging to a user without that user's consent is against Apple policy.

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Uber pulled post correlating crime data with ride demand

Uber pulled post correlating crime data with ride demand

Uber, steeped in criticism after various issues this month, has again found itself in the limelight, this time over a post from 2011 it has pulled from its blog. The post, which is still visible as a cached page, takes a look at how crime data -- and prostitution in particular -- correlates to Uber demand. The post is rather in-depth and looks at the "Uber science mutants" thought process, but has drawn some criticism due to, among other things, commentary about how observed prostitution spikes could be due to welfare checks becoming available.

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Wiper app now lets you make free encrypted calls

Wiper app now lets you make free encrypted calls

Secure messaging is a big deal to many, with ephemeral services like Snapchat a popular choice. Still, that service has been violated many times, leading some to search for a new path forward. The last time we talked about Wiper, the service was new, and pretty amazing. For a messaging platform, the encrypted app-to-app pipeline and ability to clear the chat on both ends is special. The company has recently released version 2.0 of their app, bringing the encrypted platform full circle.

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Tim Cook isn’t gay for you

Tim Cook isn’t gay for you

Let's talk about Tim Cook being gay. Or, actually, let's not talk about it at all. The Apple CEO's unexpected open letter today, discussing his reasons for suddenly talking about his sexuality and the feelings of responsibility to use his platform to further the understanding of LGBTQ issues, confirmed what many had believed for years. It also met with its fair share of "so what?" comments. The strength of reaction to who one man - even one very influential man - loves has varied widely, of course, but what's been eye-opening to me is the number of people who not only don't see why it's a big deal, but can't understand why anybody else might think differently.

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Apple CEO Tim Cook “proud to be gay”

Apple CEO Tim Cook “proud to be gay”

Apple CEO Tim Cook has publicly and openly discussed his sexuality for the first time, penning a coming out story in which he acknowledges that "I'm proud to be gay, and I consider being gay among the greatest gifts God has given me." The letter, which begins by reiterating Cook's notorious desire for privacy - despite being chief executive of one of the largest companies in the world, and certainly one of the most visible in the technology space - not only traces his steps to talking about his sexual orientation, but touches on issues of discrimination and the ways in which he would like the news to be taken.

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Google rode a camel to bring Liwa Desert to Street View

Google rode a camel to bring Liwa Desert to Street View

Aside from being a navigation tool, Google Maps' Street View has also functioned as a way for some users to live vicariously and see breath-taking sights all over the world through Google's eyes. Or to be exact, through its camera's eyes. But there are just some locations where Google's now iconic Street View Car would not be able to trek or should not be allowed to, like the sandy expanse of the Arabian desert. Luckily for Google, a camel was equally fit to do the job.

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