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Curiosity’s whole Mars mission is “history books” worthy clarifies NASA

Curiosity’s whole Mars mission is “history books” worthy clarifies NASA

NASA's teased data "for the history books" from the Curiosity Mars rover has all been a huge misunderstanding, the space agency now says, with the reference apparently encompassing the mission as a whole - not a specific finding. Anticipation was built earlier this month when principal investigator John Grotzinger told NPR that "this data is gonna be one for the history books" and that "it's looking really good"; his comments were interpreted as specific to a set of soil sample results Curiosity's onboard labs had just beamed back to Earth, but NASA says it was all a case of confusion.

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Curiosity finds “history book” worthy Mars data, but NASA won’t tell you yet

Curiosity finds “history book” worthy Mars data, but NASA won’t tell you yet

NASA's Curiosity Mars rover has discovered "some exciting new results" during its exploration of the Martian surface, but the team behind the distant explorer can't yet spill the beans as the data must be re-checked. "This data is gonna be one for the history books. It's looking really good" principal investigator John Grotzinger teased NPR, with the full reveal potentially not taking place for several weeks. However, NASA has confirmed that it's data from the SAM (Sample Analysis at Mars) tool.

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Curiosity Mars rover finds radiation levels safe for humankind

Curiosity Mars rover finds radiation levels safe for humankind

Welcome back to Mars, ladies and gentlemen, as the NASA Curiosity mission continues its epic journey across the planet's surface with a news note that they have found radiation levels totally safe for human beings. This finding is entirely encouraging for the future of Mars exploration as far as actually sending human beings there goes, and certainly doesn't send a negative mark back on the possibility of us living there someday. Of course if you're a fan of the original Total Recall, you don't care one way or another simply for the safety of your eyeballs, but still.

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Curiosity finds Mars soil a distant cousin of Hawaii

Curiosity finds Mars soil a distant cousin of Hawaii

NASA's Martian rover, Curiosity, has beamed back early results from its first mouthful of red soil, with signs that the Mars dust is similar in composition to Hawaiian volcanic basalt. X-ray diffraction testing of an accuracy previously unseen on Mars was used on a sample gathered earlier this month, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory announced, with the soil believed to be much younger than that which suggested evidence of historic water on the planet's surface several weeks ago.

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NASA Curiosity rover swallows first mouthful of Mars dirt

NASA Curiosity rover swallows first mouthful of Mars dirt

NASA's Curiosity rover has snatched a scoop of Martian soil for analysis, the culmination of years of planning as the robotic explorer begins the hunt for evidence that life might once have been supported on the red planet. The new milestone followed two test scoops Curiosity slowly gathered and discarded as part of its preparation for soil testing, with the final sample being roughly as much as a crushed baby asprin and even now running through the rover's onboard Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instrument.

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NASA’s Curiosity reveals surprises on Mars rock

NASA’s Curiosity reveals surprises on Mars rock

NASA's Curiosity robot, which has been rolling hither and yon on Mars in search of microbial life, has revealed some aspects of a rock that surprise scientists. The rock, named Jack Matijevic in honor of a NASA engineer who passed away shortly after Curiosity landed, contains a varied composition profile that was unexpected based on past missions. These newly discovered compositions give scientists a greater insight into the Martian planet's environment and processes.

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Why does NASA’s Curiosity want Mars dirt anyway?

Why does NASA’s Curiosity want Mars dirt anyway?

Mars explorer Curiosity is about to grab itself a scoopful of soil, the first time the sample gathering system has been used while the robotic rover has been on the red planet, but just what is the NASA 'bot hoping to find? According to NASA, the mission - which will see Curiosity flex its incredibly slow claw - is both a test of the rover's hardware and of the Martian surface itself, an important double-hit to help show whether Curiosity is made out for exploration, and whether Mars was once hospitable to life.

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Curiosity rover discovers ancient streambed on surface of Mars

Curiosity rover discovers ancient streambed on surface of Mars

The Curiosity rover is examining all sorts of things on the surface of Mars, but today, NASA is reporting a major breakthrough. Curiosity has discovered evidence on an old, dried up streambed on the surface of Mars, suggesting that water did once indeed flow on the Red Planet. Of course, we've seen evidence for the presence of water on Mars a few times in the past, but NASA scientists are calling this discovery "the first of its kind."

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Curiosity rover leaves Mars landing site for first time

Curiosity rover leaves Mars landing site for first time

The Curiosity rover has finally left its landing site on the surface of Mars, beginning a journey for science. The trek that lies ahead of the rover will last for weeks, and will eventually end at Glenelg, the first major spot NASA scientists want Curiosity to explore. Curiosity has already completely the first part of this 400 meter trip, driving 52 feet before stopping to look around.

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