Results for "mars curiosity"

Mars Curiosity rover is no longer in safe mode, says NASA

Mars Curiosity rover is no longer in safe mode, says NASA

On March 1, we reported that NASA's Mars Curiosity rover had experienced its first big problem, an issue with a corrupted on-board computer that prevented the robot from going into sleep mode. Fortunately, the machine has a secondary backup computer, but the malfunction prompted Curiosity to be put into Safe Mode as a precaution. NASA announced earlier today that it has been transitioned back into its active status.

Continue Reading

Mars Curiosity rover grabs a bit of soil

Mars Curiosity rover grabs a bit of soil

In an update that here on Earth would be beyond mundane, an especially exciting approach towards a ripple of sand has been made by the Mars Curiosity rover and announced today by NASA. This update includes plans for the rover to do a several day analyzation of the sand so that they might make the rover's first use of its scoop a reality. This is just the latest in a long line of updates being shared with the world as the mission moves forward - this is, of course, the most interactive a NASA mission has been allowed to be in its history.

Continue Reading

Mars Curiosity rover breathes in the air around it

Mars Curiosity rover breathes in the air around it

NASA's Curiosity rover has been on the surface of Mars for a month now, and it recently collected a sample of the air around it for the first time since landing on the surface of the Red Planet. Among its various other duties, one of Curiosity's goals is to study the air composition on Mars, and it does so by collecting air samples with its Sample Analysis at Mars instrument (Sam). Of course, NASA scientists already know what to expect when the sample results come back - carbon dioxide, and lots of it.

Continue Reading

Mars Curiosity photo size and cameras explained

Mars Curiosity photo size and cameras explained

If you were wondering why the photos coming back to us from NASA's Curiosity rover on Mars were so small, you certainly aren't alone. As Curiosity's camera project's manager Mike Ravine explains to the Digital Photography Review, it's not a matter of being able to put a more high quality camera aboard, it's the data transfer. While your smartphone is capable of transferring gigabytes of memory a day if you really want it to, the Mars mission is limited to 250 megabits per day - that's 31.25 megabytes (MB) and NASA certainly wasn't about to dedicate that whole amount to photographs only.

Continue Reading

1 2 3 4 5 Next