Results for "lenovo ideapad u1 hybrid"

Two Toshiba ARM tablets & Lenovo smartbook 1.5GHz resurrection tipped

Two Toshiba ARM tablets & Lenovo smartbook 1.5GHz resurrection tipped

Smartbook rumors a-plenty this morning, as Toshiba and Lenovo's plans for the rest of 2010 seep out of Taipei.  According to DigiTimes' sources, while Toshiba has already shown its first smartbook - which it insists on calling a MID - the Tegra 250 based AC100, the company is also apparently preparing two ARM-based tablet PCs for launch by the end of the year.  Meanwhile, Lenovo's mysterious plans for their own smartbooks have been linked with faster Qualcomm Snapdragon processors.

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Lenovo U1 Hybrid & Skylight OS Smartbook Axed in Favor of Android

Lenovo U1 Hybrid & Skylight OS Smartbook Axed in Favor of Android

It actually hasn't been that long since Lenovo promised us, and everyone else for that matter, that the U1 Hybrid and Skylight Smartbook featuring Skylight OS was still coming. Not that long at all. But, all good things must come to an end, and in all honesty, if it means that something better could be coming along, well, we're all for it. Today, Lenovo has officially pronounced the two promising platforms and pieces of hardware tech dead before arrival.

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Lenovo IdeaPad U160, U460 & U460s intro latest Core i3/i5/i7 ULV CPUs

Lenovo IdeaPad U160, U460 & U460s intro latest Core i3/i5/i7 ULV CPUs

The IdeaPad Z series aren't the only mainstream notebooks Lenovo have to announce this morning; the company has also taken the wraps off of the new Lenovo IdeaPad U series.  Admittedly the new IdeaPad U160, U460 and U460s aren't quite as interesting as the U1 Hybrid, but the 11.6-inch U160 and 14-inch U460 and U460s do slide in at under an inch in thickness while still packing Intel's new Core and Core ULV low-power processors.

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Lenovo Skylight smartbook US launch delayed until June

Lenovo Skylight smartbook US launch delayed until June

Lenovo's Skylight smartbook was meant to be shipping sometime this month, but the company has confirmed that the US launch window for the Snapdragon-based ultraportable has been pushed back to July.  A Lenovo spokesperson told Laptop that "With any new product that we introduce, we owe it to our customers to get it right and we would rather take the little extra time that sometimes takes to finalize a product," though given the company's other launch plans for the Skylight it's possibly an issue with their carrier partner in the US, AT&T, that is holding up the smartbook.

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Tablets, tablets all around (& not just Notion Ink)

Tablets, tablets all around (& not just Notion Ink)

One of the big surprises from CES 2010 last week was the sheer number of tablets. Perhaps, what with the persistent rumors of Apple's imminent entrance to the segment, that shouldn't be seen as too unusual, but as many commenters seem to have conveniently forgotten, this isn't exactly a new niche in the tech world. Microsoft, however badly they subsequently managed it, lent their weight behind compact tablets (aka UMPCs or Ultra-Mobile PCs) back in the days of Origami, and more recently we've seen PMPs first grow large, video-capable displays and then borrow internet functionality from notebooks as WiFi proliferated.

Has the iPad killed tablet innovation?

Has the iPad killed tablet innovation?

How foolish I've been. Five months ago I wrote that tablets had come of age, and even sifted my way through the line-up cherry picking what must-have features would make for the perfect device. A month later, in the afterglow - or should that be aftermath? - of the iPad announcement, I marvelled that, while Apple's slate wouldn't necessarily satisfy every user, there was nonetheless plenty of choice on the horizon for those given a taste for tableteering. Our analyst contributors wisely told me not to count my touchscreen chickens before they'd hatched onto the market, but I wouldn't listen. I thought the iPad's arrival would rejuvenate the tablet segment, but all it seems to have done is killed off any attempt at innovation.

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