Results for "large hadron collider"

Large Hadron Collider taken offline for now

Large Hadron Collider taken offline for now

Everyone in the science community must have uttered a sigh of disappointment today when word traveled that the Large Hadron Collider had been taken offline due to electrical problems. With all the talk of black hole creation and Higgs-Boson particle finding, it's easy to forget this is a piece of technology, which can malfunction.
 

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Large Hadron Collider rap makes particle physics fun

Large Hadron Collider rap makes particle physics fun

There's been a lot of talk about the Large Hadron Collider this past week since the device was switched on. And besides the scientists getting death threats and various debates about whether or not the power of the collisions produced could cause a black hole, one thing is for certain: not many people understand just what this 17-mile long machine is meant to do.

Large Hadron Collider set to turn on; scientists get death threats

Large Hadron Collider set to turn on; scientists get death threats

The Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland is all ready to be switched on September 10th, and while it could bring scientific breakthroughs, like proof of dark matter and other particles, some scientists and spectators are concerned that the device spells doomsday.

On launch day, the device will be turned on and the first proton will shoot down the collider. And even with the machine running at 450 GeV, which is under a tenth of the collider's full capacity, and with no collisions expected (the protons are only being fired in one direction), some scientists are receiving threatening emails, death threats and concerned phone calls from people wanting the project shut down. The reason? Why, it will cause the end of the world, of course.

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LHC observes Rare Particle Decay: here’s why this is super important

LHC observes Rare Particle Decay: here’s why this is super important

CMS and LHCb collaborations describe the first observation in a lab of the very rare decay B0s particle into two muon particles. Why should this matter to you, you might be asking? Why should this science have any effect on your lifestyle? It really won't - but it will affect the way we continue to unfurl the never-ending scroll of knowledge that is science and physics in our universe. Our very understanding of the nature of the Universe, the start of our existence, and the Standard Model of our universe of particles - all of this is at stake.

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LHC is active again; proton beams online and firing

LHC is active again; proton beams online and firing

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is back in action today, firing proton beams around its 27-kilometer track. The LHC has been out of active commission for two years for upgrades, maintenance, and consolidation. The most recent delay was due to a short-circuit. Its repairs didn't take as long as originally anticipated, but were tedious because the parts in need of repair operate at temperatures near absolute zero. So, the device had to be slowly thawed and then painstakingly re-frozen before it could begin operation again.

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CERN’s LHC is delayed by repairs before its 2nd run

CERN’s LHC is delayed by repairs before its 2nd run

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is preparing for its second run in Switzerland, but it has it some snags along the way. This second round of collisions will use particle beams operating at 6.5 TeV, which is much higher energy than the collider's first run. Although seven out of eight machine sectors are considered ready to go, one sector has encountered a problem which will need to be repaired before any further preparation for the collider's next run. The necessary corrections could delay the LHC's second run by a few weeks.

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Higgs Boson physicists win Nobel Physics Prize 2013

Higgs Boson physicists win Nobel Physics Prize 2013

Scientists François Englert and Peter W. Higgs have jointly won the Nobel Prize in Physics 2013 for predicting the Higgs Boson, the particle - and its connected mechanism - which underlines the way all mass works in the universe. The pair took the award "for the theoretical discovery of a mechanism that contributes to our understanding of the origin of mass of subatomic particles," the Nobel Prize committee announced today, "and which recently was confirmed through the discovery of the predicted fundamental particle, by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN's Large Hadron Collider."

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Stanford particle accelerator delivered smaller than grain of rice

Stanford particle accelerator delivered smaller than grain of rice

The U.S. Department of Energy, with the help of researchers at Stanford University and other public and private institutions, have demonstrated the ability of a chip no larger than a grain of rice to accelerate particles 10 times faster than a conventional particle accelerator can do alone. The chip, which is specially nano-fabricated of fused silica, has the potential to drastically scale down the machinery necessary for particle research, security scanners, medical devices and other technology. The global effect of this advance could be just as revolutionary as silicon was.

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Antimatter research at CERN turns up new vital clue

Antimatter research at CERN turns up new vital clue

This week a new report has been published on the possibilities surrounding antimatter using clues provided by the Large Hadron Collider* at CERN. Within LHCb, one of seven such particle physics detector experiments at the Large Hadron Collider, decays of Bs mesons have been observed for the first time in history showing more matter particles than antimatter. This is significant because it may, eventually, lead science to understand the reason for our universe preferring matter as dominant over antimatter here in our present-day post-big-bang environment.

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