Search Results for: large hadron collider

Large Hadron Collider rap makes particle physics fun

Large Hadron Collider rap makes particle physics fun

There's been a lot of talk about the Large Hadron Collider this past week since the device was switched on. And besides the scientists getting death threats and various debates about whether or not the power of the collisions produced could cause a black hole, one thing is for certain: not many people understand just what this 17-mile long machine is meant to do.

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Large Hadron Collider set to turn on; scientists get death threats

Large Hadron Collider set to turn on; scientists get death threats

The Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland is all ready to be switched on September 10th, and while it could bring scientific breakthroughs, like proof of dark matter and other particles, some scientists and spectators are concerned that the device spells doomsday.

On launch day, the device will be turned on and the first proton will shoot down the collider. And even with the machine running at 450 GeV, which is under a tenth of the collider's full capacity, and with no collisions expected (the protons are only being fired in one direction), some scientists are receiving threatening emails, death threats and concerned phone calls from people wanting the project shut down. The reason? Why, it will cause the end of the world, of course.

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Higgs Boson physicists win Nobel Physics Prize 2013

Higgs Boson physicists win Nobel Physics Prize 2013

Scientists François Englert and Peter W. Higgs have jointly won the Nobel Prize in Physics 2013 for predicting the Higgs Boson, the particle - and its connected mechanism - which underlines the way all mass works in the universe. The pair took the award "for the theoretical discovery of a mechanism that contributes to our understanding of the origin of mass of subatomic particles," the Nobel Prize committee announced today, "and which recently was confirmed through the discovery of the predicted fundamental particle, by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN's Large Hadron Collider."

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Stanford particle accelerator delivered smaller than grain of rice

Stanford particle accelerator delivered smaller than grain of rice

The U.S. Department of Energy, with the help of researchers at Stanford University and other public and private institutions, have demonstrated the ability of a chip no larger than a grain of rice to accelerate particles 10 times faster than a conventional particle accelerator can do alone. The chip, which is specially nano-fabricated of fused silica, has the potential to drastically scale down the machinery necessary for particle research, security scanners, medical devices and other technology. The global effect of this advance could be just as revolutionary as silicon was.

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Antimatter research at CERN turns up new vital clue

Antimatter research at CERN turns up new vital clue

This week a new report has been published on the possibilities surrounding antimatter using clues provided by the Large Hadron Collider* at CERN. Within LHCb, one of seven such particle physics detector experiments at the Large Hadron Collider, decays of Bs mesons have been observed for the first time in history showing more matter particles than antimatter. This is significant because it may, eventually, lead science to understand the reason for our universe preferring matter as dominant over antimatter here in our present-day post-big-bang environment.

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Higgs boson “God Particle” all but confirmed: here’s why it was worth it

Higgs boson “God Particle” all but confirmed: here’s why it was worth it

This week those responsible for working to find the elusive subatomic big of matter known as the Higgs boson have confirmed that they have, indeed, been able to confirm its existence. Of course as these scientists at CERN are, indeed, scientists, most have been just as cautious about saying they're sure of their findings as their post would indicate: the data "strongly indicates that it is a Higgs boson" - is what they've announced today. This is indeed a proud day for the $10 billion dollar Large Hadron Collider one way or another.

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CERN: Yep, looks like it’s definitely a Higgs boson

CERN: Yep, looks like it’s definitely a Higgs boson

Physicists at CERN say new data crunching indicates the LHC discovery last July is almost certainly a Higgs boson, though there's still some mystery as to which kind of the previously-theoretical particle it might be. The ATLAS and CMS teams manning the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have worked their way through 2.5x the data that was possible for the Higgs boson announcement last year, they said this week, and that initial confidence looks to have been prescient. "The preliminary results with the full 2012 data set are magnificent and to me it is clear that we are dealing with a Higgs boson" CMS spokesperson Joe Incandela said of the latest findings.

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